You are here

Human Rights & Civil Liberties

Human Rights & Civil Liberties

Dario Castillejos | Facebook Censorship / /media.cagle.com

Innocent? Don't talk to the police.

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/field/image/Rights%20%26%20Liberties%20Banner.jpg

Don’t talk to the police—except to tell them, respectfully, that you will not answer any questions and that you would like a lawyer.

James Duane, Los Angeles (CA) Times

http://fair.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/AdFree2.jpg

http://www.trbimg.com/img-57bf6fce/turbine/la-1472163875-snap-photo/400/16x9 Kash Register begins to cry after realizing he'll be freed after spending 34 years in prison for a crime he didn't commit, in Los Angeles in Superior Court in Nov. 2013. (Los Angeles Times)

August 26, 2016 | Someday soon, when you least expect it, a police officer may receive mistaken information from a confused eyewitness or a liar, or circum­stantial evidence that helps persuade him that you might be guilty of a very serious crime. When confronted with police officers and other government agents who suddenly arrive with a bunch of questions, most innocent people mistakenly think to themselves, “Why not talk? I haven’t done anything. I have nothing to hide. What could pos­sibly go wrong?”

 

Well, among other things, you could end up confessing to a crime you didn’t commit. The problem of false confessions is not an urban legend. It is a documented fact. Indeed, research suggests that the innocent may be more susceptible than the culpable to deceptive police interrogation tactics, because they tragically assume that somehow “truth and justice will prevail” later even if they falsely admit their guilt. Nobody knows for sure how often innocent people make false confessions, but as Circuit Judge Alex Kozinski recently observed, “Innocent interrogation subjects confess with surprising frequency.”

https://img.washingtonpost.com/rw/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2014/10/22/BookWorld/Images/978-0-8129-9452-0.jpg?uuid=0GWR5FnwEeS4EjhRiudMZw

James Duane is a professor at Regent Law School in Virginia Beach, Va. This essay is adapted from his book “You Have the Right to Remain Innocent,” forthcoming from Little A in September.

Full story … 

Related:

Book review |‘ Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption’ ~ Bryan Stevenson, Rob Warden, Washington (DC) Post

  • Criminal justice in America sometimes seems more criminal than just — replete with error, malfeasance, racism and cruel, if not unusual, punishment, coupled with stubborn resistance to reform and a failure to learn from even its most glaring mistakes. And nowhere, let us pray, are matters worse than in the hard Heart of Dixie, a.k.a. Alabama, the adopted stomping ground of Bryan Stevenson, champion of the damned.
  • Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption | Ebook PDF Free Download
  • Prison Without Punishment

Former CIA Analyst Ray McGovern: Obama Is ‘Afraid’ Of The CIA And The NSA

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/field/image/Rights%20%26%20Liberties%20Banner.jpg

McGovern says he believes the president can’t hold either agency accountable for their violations of the law and human rights because of the power they hold over him.

MintPress News Desk, Mint Press News

http://www.evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/twitter-4-512.png

Now you can follow Evergreene Digest on Twitter.

 

 



http://axisoflogic.com/artman/uploads/2/holder_nsa_eye498.JPGMarch 10, 2016 | A former CIA analyst believes the CIA and National Security Agency have become so powerful that the president is afraid to act against them when they break the law.

Ray McGovern retired from the CIA in 1990, following nearly 30 years of service to the agency. He was awarded the Intelligence Commendation Medal, which is given to agents who offer “especially commendable service” to the agency.

Outraged over the CIA’s open use of torture, he returned the medal in 2006 and became an antiwar activist. He was arrested in 2011 for a silent protest against a speech by then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

MintPress News is an independent watchdog journalism organization that provides issue-based original reporting, in-depth investigations, and thoughtful analysis of the most pressing topics facing our nation.

Full story … 

The Roots of Unrest in Milwaukee, WI

http://cdn.billmoyers.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/takingaboutrace_606x154b.jpg

  • The growth of poverty and inequality, the eruption of social anger, and the build-up of the police forces are interrelated components of the same class dynamic.
  • “The reality is that … this is a city where there are 27,000 households that have an income less than $10,000,” said Howard Fuller, a longtime civil rights activist and former Milwaukee schools superintendent who lives one block from the BP gas station that was burned during the unrest Saturday night.
  • Part 1: The social roots of unrest in Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Part 2: Why Milwaukee boiled over with violence after police shooting death

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

http://www.evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/twitter-4-512.png Now you can follow Evergreene Digest on Twitter.

 

 



Part 1: The social roots of unrest in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The growth of poverty and inequality, the eruption of social anger and the build-up of the police forces are interrelated components of the same class dynamic.

Niles Niemuth, World Socialist Website

https://img.washingtonpost.com/wp-apps/imrs.php?src=https://img.washingtonpost.com/rf/image_960w/2010-2019/Wires/Images/2016-08-14/AP/Officer_Involved_Shooting_Milwaukee-8ccfd.jpg&w=1484 The location where Sylville Smith was fatally shot Saturday by police in Milwaukee. (Jeffrey Phelps/AP)

16 August 2016 | Once again deeply rooted social anger has boiled over in an American city against police violence. This time protests erupted in the Sherman Park neighborhood of Milwaukee, Wisconsin following the killing of 23-year-old African American Sylville K. Smith by an as yet unidentified African American police officer Saturday afternoon.

Approximately 100 people gathered Saturday night to protest near where Smith was killed. The night ended with a handful of nearby businesses looted as well as a gas station, a bank branch and an auto parts store torched. A handful of cop cars and other vehicles were damaged or destroyed. The police arrested 31 people during protests Saturday and Sunday night.

Niles Niemuth is the 2016 US vice presidential candidate of the Socialist Equality Party and a writer for World Socialist Web Site.

Full story … 



Part 2: Why Milwaukee boiled over with violence after police shooting death

“The reality is that … this is a city where there are 27,000 households that have an income less than $10,000,” said Howard Fuller, a longtime civil rights activist and former Milwaukee schools superintendent who lives one block from the BP gas station that was burned during the unrest Saturday night.

Wesley Lowery, Washington (DC) Post

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Rights%20%26%20Liberties%20Banner.jpg

August 16, 2016 | After two nights of violent clashes between police and residents following a fatal police shooting of a young black man, Police Chief Ed Flynn stepped to the microphone late Monday night to declare a small victory.

“We’ve seen great improvement over yesterday,” Flynn said. The night had produced 10 arrests, but no rioting or property damage after officials instituted a 10 p.m. curfew. “This community is not interested in doing damage to where they live,” he said.

Wesley Lowery is a national reporter covering law enforcement and justice for the Washington Post. He previously covered Congress and national politics.

Full story … 

Pages