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Pat Bagley | Scrooged / media.cagle.com

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Union membership in Minnesota has been declining for decades. How are unions changing to stay relevant?

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REUTERS/Aaron Josefczyk

The facts remain that unions’ membership decline in Minnesota has been largely at the hands of automation, globalization, and a business climate that seeks to prevent workers from organizing more than in the past — things that don’t appear to be going away anytime soon.

Greta Kaul, MinnPost

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03/08/17 | The share of Minnesota employees who were members of unions has declined, from 23 percent in 1983 to 14 percent in 2016.

For a state with a major political party that includes “Labor” in its name, you might think Minnesota would be a haven for the union movement.

The DFL notwithstanding, that’s not necessarily the case: In the last three decades, the share of Minnesota employees who are members of a union has been on a slow, steady decline.

In 1983, 23 percent, or nearly a quarter of Minnesota employees were members of labor unions. Today, that number is down to about 14 percent, according to state-by-state breakdowns of Current Population Survey data from Unionstats, a website maintained by labor researchers at Georgia State and Trinity universities.

Greta Kaul is MinnPost's data reporter. 

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When Martin Luther King Came Out Against Vietnam

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Credit Matt Rota

 

It would be a mistake to read Dr. King’s speech as merely an antiwar statement. It reflected his widening worldview that chronic domestic poverty and military adventurism overseas infected the wealthiest nation on earth just as indelibly as did deep-rooted racism. It went to the heart of the multilayered social and political conflicts of the 1960s — and, like all great rhetoric, continues to speak to us today.

David J. Garrow, New York (NY) Times 

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https://static01.nyt.com/images/2017/04/04/opinion/04Garrow/04Garrow-master675.jpg The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at an antiwar demonstration in New York in April 1967, with Dr. Benjamin Spock to his right. Credit Agence France-Presse — Getty Images  

April 4, 2017 | Fifty years ago today — and one year to the day before his assassination — the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered the most politically charged speech of his life at Riverside Church in Upper Manhattan. It was a blistering attack on the government’s conduct of the Vietnam War that, among other things, compared American tactics to those of the Nazis during World War II.

The speech drew widespread condemnation from across the political spectrum, including from this newspaper. Other civil rights leaders, who supported the war and sought to retain President Lyndon B. Johnson as a political ally, distanced themselves from Dr. King.

David J. Garrow is the author of “Bearing the Cross: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference” and the forthcoming “Rising Star: The Making of Barack Obama.”

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How the Neighborhood That Inspired “The Wire” Is Pulling Its Residents Out of Poverty

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Lionel Terrell, who has struggled to find work due to a criminal record, is employed as part of the Clean & Green Landscaping program operated by Bon Secours Hospital. Photo by Jay Mallin.

  • When large institutions like universities and hospitals agree to hire and spend locally, they can transform neighborhoods hardest hit by poverty and unemployment.
  • Big New Allies in the War on Poverty
  • Related: International Woman's Day: When women succeed, we all win 
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Cecilia Garza & Araz Hachadourian, Yes! Magazine

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Mar 15, 2017 | It’s not often that a street intersection becomes as notorious as the corner of Fayette and Monroe in West Baltimore. During the ’80s and ’90s, the corner was ground zero for the city’s open-air drug market. Both a manifestation and symptom of Baltimore’s rising poverty, the corner became an inspiration for the television series The Wire.

A few blocks away from Fayette and Monroe is Bon Secours Hospital, built in 1919 by a group of Parisian nuns on a social mission. George Kleb was just a few years into his role as executive director of the affiliated Bon Secours Foundation when a problem was brought to his attention: The foundation had just invested $30 million in a hospital that both patients and doctors were scared to enter.

Cecilia Garza & Araz Hachadourian: Cecilia is a writer and communications professional at Social Venture Partners. She has received six awards for her work in local newswriting. Araz is a regular contributor to YES! 

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International Woman's Day: When women succeed, we all win, Facebook / #SheMeansBusiness 

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  • When women do better, economies do better. That’s why Facebook is celebrating women who have built and run businesses, and delivering resources to help those who might one day do so themselves.
  • Because the next successful entrepreneur could be anyone. She could even be you.

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