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Someone's raking it in, and it isn't you!

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  • Unless, that is, you're a CEO big on layoffs. That doesn't play well, does it?
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  • Widening pay disparities can undermine the economic system by causing many to question its basic fairness.
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  • Corporate kings grab our tax subsidies but create no new jobs.
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Kansas City Star | KS

Photo Credit: AMagill

A new report from the Institute for Policy Studies says that "CEOs of the 50 firms that have laid off the most workers since the onset of the economic crisis took home 42 percent more pay in 2009 than their peers at Standard & Poor's 500 firms."

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If true, that is a troubling finding. In tough times, expenses must be cut and executives have a duty to shareholders to ensure the survival of the enterprise. Were they to do otherwise, the nation's long-term economic prospects would suffer dramatically.

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Yet the pay raises reported by the study were tacked onto salaries already stratospheric. S&P chief executives’ median pay is $1.025 million, or around $7.5 million with bonuses and benefits. Meanwhile, their workers are getting median packages of pay and benefits worth about $40,000.

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Related:

Corporate kings grab our tax subsidies but create no new jobs. Jim Hightower, Hightower Lowdown

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  • In the past two years 55 percent of workers have lost a job or taken a cut
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  • Obama fiddles.
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How much is US Airways paying unionbusting consultants?!

$375 an hour.
Tell US Airways CEO Doug Parker: Cut your ties with your unionbusting consultants!

Manny Herrmann, American Rights at Work

That's how much US Airways is paying a consultant for advice on how to crush unions.

In the lead-up to a union election at Piedmont Airways, part of US Airways, the company has hired Labor Relations Institute (LRI), a notorious unionbusting firm "dedicated to maintaining a union-free workplace."1

By hiring LRI, US Airways is sending a clear message: They're willing to manipulate and coerce their employees to stop them from exercising their rights.

US Airways might not care about its workers, but there's one thing that big companies like this do care about: their public image. Will you give US Airways' CEO a piece of your mind? It only takes a minute, and it could make all the difference for workers at Piedmont Airlines:

Tell US Airways CEO Doug Parker: Cut your ties with your unionbusting consultants!

It's simple: Workers shouldn't face interference or coercion when deciding whether to form a union - and they should have all the facts when they cast their vote.

LRI's strategy is also simple: Manipulate workers' choice to form unions by feeding them misinformation about unions, and stopping pro-union employees from setting the record straight.

And they'll be the first to admit they have the upper hand. Here's some of their $375-per-hour advice to Piedmont:

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"The number one advantage companies have over unions during [union] election campaigns is access to voters. Simply put, you can compel employees to listen to your campaign messages..."2

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Companies should keep a hands-off approach so employees can decide on their own whether they want to form a union.

Send your message to US Airways now.

Thank you for standing up for workers at Piedmont Airlines - and for all that you do for workers' rights.

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1Labor Relations Institute website, accessed September 9, 2010
2Anti-union presentation from LRI Management Services: "Union Avoidance:
5 Keys To Winning Your Union Election."

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Managing a Micromanager

When it comes to dealing with a micromanaging boss, you have two choices, says Bud Whitehouse, of Career Management of Virginia: Run away or embrace it. Assuming you like your job and the company, the latter is preferred.

Rachel Farrell, Special to CareerBuilder

Imagine being an executive at a company and hardly having a say in the day-to-day operations. Imagine everyone in the company having to get clearance from the CEO for every decision, down to the colors and fonts used on an advertisement -- despite that each department has a manager.

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Now imagine this process for a CEO who constantly traveled and had sporadic work hours. The entire staff, executives included, spending the entire workday (sometimes more) sitting around a conference room sealing, stamping and stuffing more than 4,000 invitations because the CEO doesn't trust outside vendors to precisely place the stamps.  Better yet, imagine designing a cover with someone standing over your shoulder telling you exactly where to place each item.

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The above was reality -- literally -- for Tamara Allen, who worked at a publishing company with the above micromanager for four years.

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Section(s): 

Corporate kings grab our tax subsidies but create no new jobs.

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  • In the past two years 55 percent of workers have lost a job or taken a cut
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  • Obama fiddles
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Jim Hightower, Hightower Lowdown

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Will Shapira

By gollies, when the economic going gets tough for America's workaday people, you can always count on our tough-minded political leaders to get going! Get going, as in: rush like hell to find some gimmick to make it look like they're doing something without actually, you know, doing anything.

A golden classic of the gimmick game came from Gerald Ford. Remember Gerry? In 1973, this bland Republican House leader was chosen to be vice president when incumbent Spiro Agnew had to abdicate the office due to his untimely indictment on a mess of corruption charges. Ford then unexpectedly fell into the presidency itself in August of 1974 after Dick "I am not a crook" Nixon was forced to resign due to his own mess of corruption charges.

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Special Report | American Labor in 2010

The U.S. economy will eventually rebound from the Great Recession. Millions of American workers will not. What some economists now project -- and policymakers are loathe to admit -- is that the U.S. unemployment rate, which stood at 9.6% in August, could remain elevated for years to come.

David Culver, ed., Evergreene Digest

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Wiley Miller

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Recognizing the immense contributions of America's unions, E. J. Dionne, Syndicated columnist, Seattle Times | WA
Whatever else they achieve, unions remind us of the dignity of all who toil, whatever their social position, color or educational attainments, writes columnist E.J. Dionne Jr. Unions were important co-authors of a social contract that made our country fairer, richer and more productive.

Four Job Market Trends We Won't Be Celebrating This Labor Day, Sara Yin, Huffington Post
Labor Day, of course, was intended to celebrate the American worker. But, for those of us lucky enough to be employed, the labor market still isn't pretty.

Unemployment Rate To Remain High, Many Jobs Aren't Coming Back, Economists Say, Huffington Post
The U.S. economy will eventually rebound from the Great Recession. Millions of American workers will not. What some economists now project -- and policymakers are loathe to admit -- is that the U.S. unemployment rate, which stood at 9.6% in August, could remain elevated for years to come.

Right Response to Unemployment Is Smart Stimulus Spending, John Nichols, The Nation

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  • The federal government has spent a lot of money for the purposes of avoiding a Depression and easing a recession. But it has not spent that money well or wisely.
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  • The jobs emergency
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  • Class Warfare from the Top Down
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Shame: Senate Poised To Put 240,000 Jobs At Risk, Arthur Delaney, Huffington Post
Advocates of a welfare-to-work program created by last year's stimulus bill are calling on Congress not to jeopardize some 240,000 jobs by letting the program expire at the end of September.

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