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Mike Thompson | Third World America / cmsimg.freep.com

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Virginia United Against Oppression

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  • Virginia United Against Oppression says it aims to stop "all out assault" on undocumented people and workers in the Commonwealth.
    Organizers point to the widespread outrage expressed over similar legislation last year in Arizona, and plan to be beat legislators to the punch in Virginia.
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  • A New Year, A New Fight
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  • Republicans Hope to Trample Constitution With Racist New Proposals
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Socialist WebZine

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A new group called Virginia United Against Oppression has formed a statewide campaign in Virginia to fight racist anti-immigration and anti-worker rights legislation in the General Assembly. The group has organizers statewide building a campaign against the "massive attack on all people living in Virginia".

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The 7 anti-immigrant bills are expected to move through the short session of the General Assembly over the next two weeks, ostensibly to get them to the floor before public opposition is increased.

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A similar process exists for the bills pertaining to workers rights.

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Activists and citizens are mobilizing across the state to bring attention to this these issues pointing out that:

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A New Year, A New Fight, Reform Immigration for America

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  • The GOP has introduced legislation to eliminate birthright citizenship, a right granted by the 14th Amendment to the Constitution.
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  • Report: 130 Republicans In Congress Want To Consider Ending Birthright Citizenship
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  • Republicans Hope to Trample Constitution With Racist New Proposals
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Republicans Hope to Trample Constitution With Racist New Proposals, Ian Millhiser, ThinkProgress
For the last two years, conservatives have flouted their disdain for the Constitution <http://thinkprogress.org/2010/11/15/scalia-seventeenth/>and their desire to effectively replace it with a Tea Party manifesto. Sadly, they appear to be wasting no time after last November’s election in declaring war on the nation’s founding document.

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Why aren't employers calling me back?

Here, experts weigh in on what might be behind that silence -- and what you can do to get the conversation rolling.

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Beth Braccio Hering, Special to CareerBuilder
At a time when corporations are buying up elections – not to mention the 24-hour-news cycle – help ensure that a source for truly independent journalism lives on. Support Evergreene Digest  today by using the donation button in the above right-hand corner.

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You write a killer cover letter, tailor your résumé to highlight skills described in the job ad and double-check your application before sending to make sure it includes everything the company requested. All that is left to do is sit back and wait for the employer to contact you.

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But as days turn into weeks without hearing a peep, questions arise. Did they get my material? Has the job been filled? Did they just not like me?

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Here, experts weigh in on what might be behind that silence -- and what you can do to get the conversation rolling.

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The War Against Public Sector Unions

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  • It's pretty easy to understand how a recession would fuel growing taxpayer resentment toward public sector union benefits they're paying for. The next few years are going to be rough ones for public sector workers.
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  • Throwing Public Unions Under the Bus
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  • Let's bust the myths about public unions
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Kevin Drum, Mother Jones

James Surowiecki writes about the growing resentment toward public sector unions:

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There are a couple of reasons for this. In the past, a sizable percentage of American workers belonged to unions, or had family members who did. Then, too, even people who didn’t belong to unions often reaped some benefit from them, because of what economists call the “threat effect”: in heavily unionized industries, non-union employers had to pay their workers better in order to fend off unionization. Finally, benefits that union members won for themselves—like the eight-hour day, or weekends off—often ended up percolating down to other workers. These days, none of those things are true.

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....Even though unions remain the loudest political voice for workers’ interests, resentment has replaced solidarity, which helps explain why the bailout of General Motors was almost as unpopular as the bailouts of Wall Street banks. And, at a time when labor is already struggling to organize new workers, this is grim news. In a landmark 1984 study, the economists Richard Freeman and James Medoff showed that there was a strong connection between the public image of unions and how workers voted in union elections: the less popular unions were generally, the harder it was for them to organize. Labor, in other words, may be caught in a vicious cycle, becoming progressively less influential and more unpopular. The Great Depression invigorated the modern American labor movement. The Great Recession has crippled it.

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Throwing Public Unions Under the Bus,  Shamus Cooke, Truthout

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  • Public workers cannot be spectators in this unfolding drama. They must learn to act collectively. Unions must educate their membership about the gravity of the coming assault. Anti-union attacks must be resisted while alternatives are proposed; state funding must be increased by raising taxes on the rich and the corporations. If public employee unions are busted, the rest of the labor movement will be targeted next – but it will be too weak to defend itself.
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  • Let's bust the myths about public unions
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Let's bust the myths about public unions, Eliot Seide, Minneapolis Star Tribune | MN
These are average Minnesotans who serve the needs the governor neglects.

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The Most Persistent Myth About The Unemployment Rate

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Arthur Delaney, Huffington Post

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Every time the government reports that the unemployment rate declined during the previous month, swarms of Internet users say in forums, comment sections and emails that the only reason the jobs situation seemed to improve is because thousands of people had their unemployment insurance benefits cut off.

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On Friday (Dec 7), for instance, when the government reported that the unemployment rate fell from 9.8 percent to 9.4 percent, this reporter received an email arguing that the rate is deceptive, "Because 400,000 people with unemployment insurance lost their unemployment insurance benefits in November 2010. These 400,000 were not counted."

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Extended Unemployment and UI Benefits, Rob Valletta and Katherine Kuang, Newsletter, US Federal Reserve Board, San Francisco, CA
During the current labor market downturn, unemployment duration has reached levels well above its previous highs. Analysis of unemployment data suggests that extended unemployment insurance benefits have not been important factors in the increase in the duration of unemployment or in the elevated unemployment rate.

John Barrasso Blocks Unemployment Bill He Doesn't Understand, Arthur Delaney, Huffington Post
Wyoming Republican Sen. John Barrasso blocked a request to reauthorize extended unemployment benefits on Thursday, saying a better way to help the unemployed would be to improve the economy by giving "certainty" to businesses on taxes.

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