You are here

Labor

Labor Logo

Special Report | Amazon & Wal-mart: Big Box Retailers Behaving Criminally

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Banner%20Corporate%20Accountability.jpg

  • Part 1: Report: How Amazon's Tightening Grip on the Economy Is Stifling Competition, Eroding Jobs, and Threatening Communities
  • Amazon is far more than a big, aggressive retailer. 
  • Part 2: Who should pay: You or Walmart?
  • Who do you think should pay the price of providing security for property and other minor crimes in Walmart stores?

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 



Part 1: Report: How Amazon's Tightening Grip on the Economy Is Stifling Competition, Eroding Jobs, and Threatening Communities

Olivia LaVecchia, Institute for Local Self-Reliance

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Donate%20Now%20%28Green%29.jpgProducing in-depth, thoughtful journalism for a better world is expensive – but supporting us isn’t. If you value ad-free independent journalism, consider supporting Evergreene Digest today.

In earnest,

Dave & the Crew

https://ilsr.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Amazon-Report-Cover_border-320x412.png Nov 29, 2016 | For all of its reach, Amazon, the company founded by Jeff Bezos in 1995 as an online bookstore, is still remarkably invisible. It makes it easy not to notice how powerful and wide-ranging it has become. But behind the packages on the doorstep and the inviting interface, Amazon has quietly positioned itself at the center of a growing share of our daily activities and transactions, extending its tentacles across our economy, and with it, our lives.

 

Today, half of all U.S. households are subscribed to the membership program Amazon Prime, half of all online shopping searches start directly on Amazon, and Amazon captures nearly one in every two dollars that Americans spend online. Amazon sells more books, toys, and by next year, apparel and consumer electronics than any retailer online or off, and is investing heavily in its grocery business. Its market power now rivals or exceeds that of Walmart, and it stands only to grow: Within five years, one-fifth of the U.S.’s $3.6 trillion retail market will have shifted online, and Amazon is on track to capture two-thirds of that share.

Read the report — and maps, timelines, and more.

Olivia LaVecchia is a Research Associate with ILSR’s Community-Scaled Economy Initiative. A former reporter, her work has won recognition locally and nationally, including the 2014 “Media for a Just Society” award for newspaper writing.

Full story … 



Part 2: Who should pay: You or Walmart?

Who do you think should pay the price of providing security for property and other minor crimes in Walmart stores?

 

Randy Parraz, Making Change at Walmart  

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Walmart%20Police%20Line%20and%20Patrol%20Car.jpgNovember 21, 2016 | Over the past year, there have been many news stories and headlines regarding how much crime happens at Walmart, and how often local police officers are being called to Walmart stores. The statistics are shocking:

• Law enforcement logged nearly 16,800 calls in one year to Walmarts in four Florida counties, according to a Tampa Bay Times analysis. That’s two calls an hour, every hour, every day.

According to an analysis from Bloomberg News, in one year, police were called to one of Tulsa’s four Walmarts just under 2,000 times. They were called to one of the city’s four Targets around 300 times.

• A local news story reported that within four Massachusetts counties, police received 1,773 calls for incidents at five Walmarts in 2015 -- about one every day. Seven out of 10 times, no arrests were made.

• A Walmart in Denver, CO, experienced 3.7 police calls per day in 2015.

You can read more about crime in Walmart here and here, or watch this segment from Inside Edition.

In the coming days and weeks, we’ll be out in front of Walmarts all across the country to talk to customers and workers about their concerns, and how they think this problem should be handled. Does Walmart experience more crime because the stores are under-staffed? Are they training workers properly on how to deal with potential crimes?

Making Change at Walmart believes that

• It’s Walmart’s job to provide sufficient security staff for its stores.

• The large number of police calls to Walmart stores questions whether Walmart is relying too much on the taxpayer to provide security.

• Walmart should place security ahead of profits, and invest in more store security.

We’d like to hear from you: Who do you think should pay the price of providing security for property and other minor crimes in Walmart stores?

Text W to 698-329 if you think Walmart should pay.

Text T to 698-329 if you think taxpayers should pay.

Thank you for sharing your opinion with us, and stay tuned for more news soon.

Randy Parrazz, Campaign Director

Making Change at Walmart 

 http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 

Section(s): 

An Ideal Blueprint: The Original Black Panther Party Model and Why It Should Be Duplicated

http://cdn.billmoyers.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/takingaboutrace_606x154b.jpg

The (Black Panther Party's) BPP's model is needed today. A firm foundation of knowledge, history, internationalism, and political economy is needed. A concerted effort to bond with and assist our working-class communities and disenfranchised sisters and brothers is needed. An infusion of authentic, working-class politics which shifts the focus from 'middle-class erosion' to 'multi-generational disenfranchisement' is needed. The blueprint is there. Let's use it.

Colin Jenkins, The Hampton Institute

http://www.evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/twitter-4-512.pngNow you can follow Evergreene Digest on Twitter.

 

 



http://www.hamptoninstitution.org/images/BPP.JPG July 10th, 2014 | The rise of the Black Panther Party (BPP) in the late 1960s signified a monumental step toward the development of self-determination in the United States. In a nation that has long suffered a schizophrenic existence, characterized by a grand facade of "freedom, liberty and democracy" hiding what Alexis de Tocqueville once aptly described as "old aristocratic colours breaking through,"[1] the BPP model provided hope to not only Black Americans who had experienced centuries of inhumane treatment, but also to the nation's exploited and oppressed working class majority that had been inherently disregarded by both the founding fathers' framework and the predatory nature of capitalism.

As we grind our way through the tail-end of a neoliberal storm, it has become clear that in an age of extreme inequality, unabated corporate power, and overwhelming government corruption at all levels; we have a war on our hands. Not a war in the traditional international sense, but a domestic class war; one that has decimated our communities, our hopes for a better future, our children's educations, and our collective physical and mental well-being. The aggressors in this war are powerful - so much so that resistance often seems futile, and the opposition insurmountable. Multi-trillion dollar financial institutions and multi-billion dollar corporations pulling the strings of the most powerful politicians - Presidents, Senators, Congress members, and Governors alike - all of whom have at their disposal the abilities to print money at will, control markets through fiscal and monetary policy, deploy powerful militaries anywhere in the world, and unleash militarized police forces to terrorize our neighborhoods.

Colin Jenkins, an interdisciplinary researcher and writeris founder, is editor and Social Economics Department chair at the Hampton Institute. He has been published at Truthout, Common Dreams, Dissident Voice, Black Agenda Report, Popular Resistance, Z Magazine, and New Politics.

Full story … 

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 

Special Report | War On The Homeless- Day Jobs, Not Tickets

http://images.mx3.americanprogressaction.org/EloquaImages/clients/CenterForAmericanProgress/%7B067c67f4-4e63-47d0-8ce8-c3e119054d0c%7D_com_nwl_c4e_socialprogress-banner.jpg

  • Part 1: War On The Homeless 
  • Cities All Over America Are Passing Laws Making It Illegal To Feed And Shelter Those In Need
  • Part 2: Albuquerque Gives Panhandlers Day Jobs, Not Tickets
  • While other cities try to regulate or ban panhandlers, Albuquerque, N.M., offers them an income and social services for the day.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

http://globalassets.starbucks.com/assets/20229527c1c240439ddbc81bf821d95e.jpg If you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

 



Part 1: War On The Homeless 

Cities All Over America Are Passing Laws Making It Illegal To Feed And Shelter Those In Need

blogfactory

http://blogfactory.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/unnamed-24.jpg December 07, 2016 | If you want to be a “Good Samaritan” to the homeless in your community, you might want to check and see if it is legal first.  All over the country, cities are passing laws that make it illegal to feed and shelter the homeless.  For example, in this article you will read about a church in Maryland that was just fined $12,000 for simply allowing homeless people to sleep outside the church at night.  This backlash against homeless people comes at a time when homelessness in America is absolutely exploding.  In a previous article, I shared with my readers the fact that the number of homeless people in New York City has just set a brand new all-time high, and the homelessness crisis in California has become so severe that the L.A. City Council has formally asked Governor Jerry Brown to declare a state of emergency.  Sadly, instead of opening up our hearts to the rapidly growing number of Americans without a home, way too many communities are trying to use the law to force them to go somewhere else.

For nearly two thousand years, churches have been at the forefront of helping the poor and disadvantaged, but now many communities are trying to stop this from happening.  Earlier today, I was absolutely stunned when I came across an article that talked about how a church in Dundalk, Maryland has been fined $12,000 for allowing the homeless to sleep outside the church at night.

blogfactory: the on-line magazine for you

Full story … 



Part 2: Albuquerque Gives Panhandlers Day Jobs, Not Tickets

While other cities try to regulate or ban panhandlers, Albuquerque, N.M., offers them an income and social services for the day.

J.B. Wogan, Governing

Participants in Albuquerque's "There's a Better Way" initiative working on a city beautification project. All photos provided by the city of Albuquerque, used with permission.

October 13, 2015 | Twice a week, a city van rolls through downtown Albuquerque, N.M., stopping at popular panhandling locations. The driver, Will Cole, asks panhandlers if they want a day job. Work pays $9 an hour, higher than the state's $7.50 minimum wage. The city's public works department can employ up to 10 people a day for beautification projects, such as pulling weeds and picking up litter. The van has been in circulation since September, and while "we get a couple no's here and there," said Cole, he's usually finds 10 people willing to trade panhandling for a day job.

The van initiative is part of a larger effort in Albuquerque to reduce homelessness and panhandling. In May, the city started posting blue and white signs at intersections that list a 311 phone number and a website. Panhandlers can call the number to connect with services. At the same time, motorists can visit the website, managed by the United Way of Central New Mexico, to donate to a local shelter, food bank or an employment fund to pay panhandlers' wages.

J.B. Wogan, Staff Writer, Governing

Full story … 

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 

 

You Can Keep Studying White Working Class Voters, But We Know the Answers.

http://esq.h-cdn.co/assets/16/46/980x490/landscape-1479493977-penn.jpg

Getty Eduardo Munoz Alvarez

  • This story has been unravelling for decades.
  • Related: Missing from election debate: Unions key to economy, democracy

Charles P. Pierce, Esquire

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Money%20Pie.jpg Nov 18, 2016 | In the current issue of the magazine incarnation of Tiger Beat On The Potomac can be found yet another anthropological study of People With Whom I Empathize But Do Not Understand. It's a fine piece of reporting and writing because it's by Mike Kruse, who's as good as it gets. However, again, I am baffled by the gaping chasms of cognitive dissonance from the people therein quoted, and I am again overwhelmed with dread over what's going to happen when these people realize they've been so completely played.

This expedition takes us to eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania, and it features the kind of people who gave Donald Trump his margin of victory in the electoral college, and many of whom, quite sadly, seem to be resigned already to the fact that he's not going to be able to deliver on many of his more baroque promises. The steel jobs are not coming back. Coal is a dying industry, unless the people making billions on fracking can be convinced to trade us new earthquakes for old respiratory ailments. The opioid drug problem in places like Johnstown isn't going away even if you dig a 100-mile moat between Texas and Mexico and fill it with piranha and burning oil.

Charles P. Pierce has been a working journalist since 1976. He is the author of four books, most recently 'Idiot America.' He lives near Boston with his wife but no longer his three children.

Full story … 

Related: 

http://www.evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/twitter-4-512.png Now you can follow Evergreene Digest on Twitter.

 

 


Missing from election debate: Unions key to economy, democracy, Larry Rubin, People's World 

http://inthesetimes.com/images/2011/headers/BlogHed_working.gif

Unfortunately, once the election season began, no candidate has stressed how central building union bargaining strength is to the solving of many problems facing America.

Related: What Punch Pizza learned from raising its wages

http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PlsShareArrow5.png

 

Pages