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Class: Social Dynamite for Trump's Gang

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  • Part 1: Trump era confronts organized labor with gravest crisis in decades
  • The crisis for unions is a combination of direct threats from Trump's agenda and the knowledge that many rank-and-file workers are sympathetic to his populist message.
  • Part 2: Western PA Labor Leader Offended By Trump Attack On Steelworkers
  • "I don't have a Twitter account but, if I did, I'd give him my number and address," (Tony) Tepsic (president of the United Steelworkers Local 1212 in Midland, PA) said. "If he wants to boast about saving jobs, I got a plant in Midland we can talk about."

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1: Trump era confronts organized labor with gravest crisis in decades

The crisis for unions is a combination of direct threats from Trump's agenda and the knowledge that many rank-and-file workers are sympathetic to his populist message.

Steven Mufson, Washington (DC) PostLeftLinks

http://media.philly.com/images/800*533/3+x+2+richard+trumka.jpg Richard Trumpka, President of the AFL-CIO

Dec 8, 2016 - President-elect Donald Trump's Twitter attack this week on a union official, followed by his choice of a labor secretary who has criticized new worker protections, has rattled leaders of the American labor movement, who fear unions may be facing their gravest crisis in decades.

On Thursday, Trump announced that he would nominate as his labor secretary Andrew Puzder, a fast-food executive who has opposed additional overtime pay for workers and expressed skepticism about increasing the minimum wage. That followed a pair of Twitter messages Wednesday evening in which Trump attacked an Indiana union leader who had criticized him, saying the official had done a "terrible job representing workers."

Steven Mufson covers energy and other financial matters for the Washington (DC) Post. Since joining the Post, he has covered the White House, China, economic policy and diplomacy. 

Full story … 



Part 2: Western PA Labor Leader Offended By Trump Attack On Steelworkers

"I don't have a Twitter account but, if I did, I'd give him my number and address," (Tony) Tepsic (president of the United Steelworkers Local 1212 in Midland, PA) said. "If he wants to boast about saving jobs, I got a plant in Midland we can talk about."

Jared Stonesifer, Beaver County (PA) Times / LeftLinks

http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/timesonline.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a6/ea61e1a4-4510-11e5-9737-4fc0ab84fca7/55d22df884303.image.jpg?resize=1200%2C803 Tony Tepsic, president of the United Steelworkers Local 1212 in Midland, PA, speaking to strikers outside ATI plant in Midland, PA

 

Dec 9, 2016 - MIDLAND, PA -- Tony Tepsic doesn't have a Twitter account but, if he did, he would tell Donald Trump just when and where to find him.

Tepsic, president of the United Steelworkers Local 1212 in Midland, PA, took offense to the fact that the president-elect earlier this week attacked a fellow United Steelworkers local president in Indiana.

The feud started when Trump claimed he helped save 1,100 jobs from leaving Indiana. Chuck Jones, president of United Steelworkers Local 1999 based in Indianapolis, called Trump a liar and said the real number of jobs saved was around 800.

Jared Stonesifer: Energy, business and transportation reporter for the Beaver County (PA) Times.

Full story … 

The Meaning Americans Find in Their Jobs

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  • "Work is “a search, too, for daily meaning as well as daily bread, for recognition as well as cash, for astonishment rather than torpor; in short, for a sort of life rather than a Monday through Friday sort of dying.” --Studs Terkel book, Working
  • Conversations with 100 people about their work and how it shapes who they are.
  • Related: The Spiritual Crisis of the Modern Economy

Bourlee Lam and Adrienne Green, the Atlantic 

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http://cloudfront.mediamatters.org/static/images/sidecar/workers-275.png Nov 30, 2016 | Every month the Labor Department issues its jobs report, providing a snapshot of the American economy—how many people are employed, how many are looking for work, whether wages are improving or declining. Behind all those numbers are people. What motivates them to go to their jobs every day? What are their hopes for themselves and their families? How does their work affect how they see themselves?

Over the course of several months, we spoke with more than 100 American workers of diverse backgrounds, occupations, and regions about what their work. The project was loosely-based on the 1974 Studs Terkel book Working, in which he describes work as, “a search, too, for daily meaning as well as daily bread, for recognition as well as cash, for astonishment rather than torpor; in short, for a sort of life rather than a Monday through Friday sort of dying.”

Bourlee Lam is an associate editor at the Atlantic. She was previously the editor of Freakonomics.com

Adrienne Green, is an assistant editor at the Atlantic .

Full story … 

 

Related:

 

The Spiritual Crisis of the Modern EconomyVictor Tan Chen, the Atlantic 

 

 

Matteo Colombo / Getty

The modern economy privileges the well-educated and highly-skilled, while giving them an excuse to denigrate the people at the bottom (both white and nonwhite) as lazy, untalented, uneducated, and unsophisticated.

Related: The Meaning Americans Find in Their Jobs

 

 

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Special Report | Amazon & Wal-mart: Big Box Retailers Behaving Criminally

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  • Part 1: Report: How Amazon's Tightening Grip on the Economy Is Stifling Competition, Eroding Jobs, and Threatening Communities
  • Amazon is far more than a big, aggressive retailer. 
  • Part 2: Who should pay: You or Walmart?
  • Who do you think should pay the price of providing security for property and other minor crimes in Walmart stores?

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 



Part 1: Report: How Amazon's Tightening Grip on the Economy Is Stifling Competition, Eroding Jobs, and Threatening Communities

Olivia LaVecchia, Institute for Local Self-Reliance

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In earnest,

Dave & the Crew

https://ilsr.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Amazon-Report-Cover_border-320x412.png Nov 29, 2016 | For all of its reach, Amazon, the company founded by Jeff Bezos in 1995 as an online bookstore, is still remarkably invisible. It makes it easy not to notice how powerful and wide-ranging it has become. But behind the packages on the doorstep and the inviting interface, Amazon has quietly positioned itself at the center of a growing share of our daily activities and transactions, extending its tentacles across our economy, and with it, our lives.

 

Today, half of all U.S. households are subscribed to the membership program Amazon Prime, half of all online shopping searches start directly on Amazon, and Amazon captures nearly one in every two dollars that Americans spend online. Amazon sells more books, toys, and by next year, apparel and consumer electronics than any retailer online or off, and is investing heavily in its grocery business. Its market power now rivals or exceeds that of Walmart, and it stands only to grow: Within five years, one-fifth of the U.S.’s $3.6 trillion retail market will have shifted online, and Amazon is on track to capture two-thirds of that share.

Read the report — and maps, timelines, and more.

Olivia LaVecchia is a Research Associate with ILSR’s Community-Scaled Economy Initiative. A former reporter, her work has won recognition locally and nationally, including the 2014 “Media for a Just Society” award for newspaper writing.

Full story … 



Part 2: Who should pay: You or Walmart?

Who do you think should pay the price of providing security for property and other minor crimes in Walmart stores?

 

Randy Parraz, Making Change at Walmart  

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Walmart%20Police%20Line%20and%20Patrol%20Car.jpgNovember 21, 2016 | Over the past year, there have been many news stories and headlines regarding how much crime happens at Walmart, and how often local police officers are being called to Walmart stores. The statistics are shocking:

• Law enforcement logged nearly 16,800 calls in one year to Walmarts in four Florida counties, according to a Tampa Bay Times analysis. That’s two calls an hour, every hour, every day.

According to an analysis from Bloomberg News, in one year, police were called to one of Tulsa’s four Walmarts just under 2,000 times. They were called to one of the city’s four Targets around 300 times.

• A local news story reported that within four Massachusetts counties, police received 1,773 calls for incidents at five Walmarts in 2015 -- about one every day. Seven out of 10 times, no arrests were made.

• A Walmart in Denver, CO, experienced 3.7 police calls per day in 2015.

You can read more about crime in Walmart here and here, or watch this segment from Inside Edition.

In the coming days and weeks, we’ll be out in front of Walmarts all across the country to talk to customers and workers about their concerns, and how they think this problem should be handled. Does Walmart experience more crime because the stores are under-staffed? Are they training workers properly on how to deal with potential crimes?

Making Change at Walmart believes that

• It’s Walmart’s job to provide sufficient security staff for its stores.

• The large number of police calls to Walmart stores questions whether Walmart is relying too much on the taxpayer to provide security.

• Walmart should place security ahead of profits, and invest in more store security.

We’d like to hear from you: Who do you think should pay the price of providing security for property and other minor crimes in Walmart stores?

Text W to 698-329 if you think Walmart should pay.

Text T to 698-329 if you think taxpayers should pay.

Thank you for sharing your opinion with us, and stay tuned for more news soon.

Randy Parrazz, Campaign Director

Making Change at Walmart 

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