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Lisa Benson | Gay Marriage / Slate.com

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Other Countries Probing Bush-era Torture — Why Aren't We?

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"That's part of why we're so concerned. The Obama administration, rather than investigate the abuses of the last eight years, has increasingly become an obstacle to accountability."

Shashank Bengali, the McClatchy Newspapers, in Common Dreams

In June, the Supreme Court refused to hear the case of a Canadian man who contends that U.S. authorities mistook him for an al Qaida operative in 2002 and shipped him to a secret prison in Syria, where he was beaten with electrical cables and held in a grave-like cell for 10 months.

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Four years earlier, however, the Canadian government had concluded an exhaustive inquiry and found that the former prisoner, Maher Arar, was telling the truth. Canada cleared Arar of all ties to terrorism and paid him $10 million in damages, and his lawyers say he's cooperating with an investigation into the role of U.S. and Syrian officials in his imprisonment and reported torture.

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US Judge OK's Confession Extracted by Threatening Suspect with Rape

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  • Omar Ahmed Khadr, apprehended at age 15, imprisoned in Gitmo for the past 7 years awaiting trial for terrorism and war crimes.
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  • ACLU Report: Obama Continuing Bush-Era Torture Policies
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Eric W. Dolan, Raw Story

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Ken Mitchell

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In one of the first military commissions held under the Obama administration, a US military judge has ruled that confessions obtained by threatening the subject with rape are admissible in court.

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The case involves Omar Ahmed Khadr, a citizen of Canada who was apprehended in Afghanistan when he was 15 years old and has remained in Guantanamo Bay for the last seven years awaiting trial for terrorism and war crimes.

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As AFP reported on Monday (Aug 9) , Khadr, now 23, is accused of throwing a grenade in 2002 that killed a US soldier. He also is alleged to have been trained by Al-Qaeda and joined a network organized by Osama bin Laden to make bombs.

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ACLU Report: Obama Continuing Bush-Era Torture Policies, Deborah Weinstein,  TruthOut.org, in AlterNet

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  • Fear of an unchecked, unaccountable government permeates the report, particularly in the section about targeted killings.
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  • On torture, U.S. must clean house
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Protests of UST Law Prof Delahunty's Co-Authoring of Bush Torture Memos

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  • "The University of St. Thomas School of Law, as a Catholic law school, is dedicated to integrating faith and reason in the search for truth through a focus on morality and social justice."
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  • Center for Torture Accountability lists U St. Thomas Professor  Delahunty as deserving probe.
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Coleen Rowley, Evergreene Digest

Leafleting and bannering on August 16th and on August 30th to remind the St. Thomas School of Law how it’s failing to follow its own Mission Statement when it employs Robert Delahunty who coauthored with John Yoo the Office of Legal Counsel memos that declared the Geneva Conventions no longer applied to “non-state Actors” thus opening the door to torture.

August 16, Monday:  4:30 - 5:30 pm, at 1000 LaSalle Avenue, Minneapolis  (during a student reception event)

August 30, Monday:  10:00 - 11:00 or 11:30 at 1000 LaSalle Avenue, Minneapolis (Robert Delahunty’s return to classes)

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Center for Torture Accountability lists St. Thomas Professor  Delahunty as deserving probe, The Center for Torture Accountability<>
Delahunty helps John Yoo write memos making legal case for suspending constitutional rights and protections

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Center for Torture Accountability lists St. Thomas Professor Delahunty as deserving probe

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Delahunty helps John Yoo write memos making legal case for suspending constitutional rights and protections

The Center for Torture Accountability

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Bob Heberle

Robert Delahunty, whose Justice Department career spanned the presidency of Clinton as well as the early Bush years, found in his new colleague John Yoo a legal philosophy rooted in the same way of thinking as his own. They collaborated on a spate of memos for the White House and Justice Department, most of which have not yet been declassified.

Delahunty is not known to have coauthored Yoo's notorious "torture memo," which attempted to define torture so narrowly that the United States's interrogation techniques could not be classified as torturous. But he and Yoo did produce memos arguing that neither the Geneva Conventions nor other treaties and law would control U.S. treatment of prisoners during the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

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