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Randy Bish | Public Prayer / media.cagle.com

Randy Bish | Public Prayer / media.cagle.com

 

Section(s): 

Modern-Day Slavery in America's Prison Workforce

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  • Why can't we embrace the idea that prisoners have labor rights?
  • The Great American Chain Gang
  • Drug Cocktail Used In Executions Is Too Painful To Use On Animals

Beth Schwartzapfel, American Progress

I%20Want%20You%20with%2010%20yr%20banner.jpg If you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

 

ap071022053418.jpg?itok=BdniJa5i Sandra Amritt, a cook for the Onslow County Jail, prepares a tray for the day's lunch Oct. 22, 2007, in Onslow County, Jacksonville, N.C. AP Photo/The Daily News, Don Bryan

Laurie Hazen has bad taste in men. “They’re my downfall,” the 41-year-old jokes in her Massachusetts accent. “I have to really stay single.” An ex-boyfriend first introduced her to prescription drugs, she says, a habit she maintained through the course of another relationship, with another addict, and through two stints in prison, most recently in 2012 for writing fake prescriptions.

When she arrived at the Massachusetts Correctional Institution in Framingham, Hazen left behind a job as a records manager for a fiber-optics company. Her $14-an-hour salary had covered food, utilities, and rent on the modest apartment she shared with her boyfriend and her teenage son. She would have been putting some money away, too, if her paycheck hadn’t also been covering the couple’s drug habit. As it was, like many inmates, she went to prison with no savings and, because her boyfriend was locked up too, had no one on the outside to send her money. Her son went to live with his dad.

Beth Schwartzapfel is a freelance journalist living in Boston. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Mother Jones, The Nation, and other publications.

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Drug Cocktail Used In Executions Is Too Painful To Use On Animals, Simon McCormack, Huffington Post

  • Veterinarians in at least one state are barred from using a three-drug formula used on several inmates, including Clayton Lockett last week. 
  • For-Profit Corporation Seeks Protection of its "Religious Freedom"

 

Section(s): 

The Latest Affirmative Action Decision Isn't Just About Race

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The Supreme Court's decision sweeps away decades of equal protection precedent.

Patricia J. Williams, The Nation

20140503/1399135998_9883.jpg Source: abovethelaw.com

May 2, 2014  |  The name of the Supreme Court’s latest case involving university admissions describes the battle lines: Schuette, Attorney General of Michigan v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, Integration and Immigrant Rights and Fight for Equality by Any Means Necessary. When the Court found for Schuette, headlines declared the decision a landmark ruling against affirmative action. But technically, the Court did not retreat from its prior holdings: race sensitivity is still a constitutionally permissible criterion when weighing the applications of similarly qualified candidates.

The case addressed a challenge to Article I, Section 26, of the Michigan Constitution, which altered the decision-making capacity of the regents and trustees of the state’s public university system. Section 26 took away those boards’ ability to use otherwise constitutionally permissible race-sensitive criteria for admissions—i.e., a backdoor way of banning affirmative action in the state. Schuette was also a broad capitulation to an old notion of states’ rights, allowing localities to opt out of federal equal-protection measures designed to dismantle segregation. Following this ruling, states can merely override those measures, one by one. The bottom line? What is expressly permissible as a matter of the US Constitution is now forbidden in Michigan. Not only that, it has removed affirmative action in Michigan from the democratic process. Where once these policies were negotiated through elected university boards, requiring a degree of popular will, Section 26 has ended discussion with a blanket ban.

Patricia J. Williams, a professor of law at Columbia University and a member of the State Bar of California, writes The Nation column "Diary of a Mad Law Professor."

Full story … 

 

Drug Cocktail Used In Executions Is Too Painful To Use On Animals

Veterinarians in at least one state are barred from using a three-drug formula used on several inmates, including Clayton Lockett last week. 

 

Simon McCormack, Huffington Post

 

n-CLAYTON-LOCKETT-large570.jpg Clayton Lockett

05/07/2014 | The drug cocktail used to execute an Oklahoma inmate who writhed on the gurney before eventually suffering a massive heart attack is deemed too painful to use on animals, according to a new report by The Constitution ProjectI'll.

Veterinarians in at least one state are barred from using a three-drug formula used on several inmates, including Clayton Lockett last week. Lockett, who was convicted in 2000 of murdering a 19-year-old woman, died almost two hours after the lethal injection drugs were administered.

 

Simon McCormack is a Crime and Weird News editor for the Huffington Post.

 

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Standing Up For Our Rights

  • "Power concedes nothing without demand. It never did and it never will." --Frederick Douglass
  • Part 1: New Mexico stands up against police brutality
  • Part 2: Missouri Protesters Arrested After Demanding Their Lawmakers Pass Medicaid Expansion 

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest



Part 1: New Mexico stands up against police brutality

new-mexico-police-brutality-demo.jpg April 21, 2014 | Sydney Hodge of the Party for Socialism and Liberation reports on the Albuquerque, New Mexico movement against police brutality that has emerged in the wake of the killing of James Boyd captured on video.

Full story (audio) …



Part 2: Missouri Protesters Arrested After Demanding Their Lawmakers Pass Medicaid Expansion

More than 100 protesters and clergy members were removed from the Missouri Senate galleries on Tuesday, after they burst out into chants demanding the state accept Obamacare's Medicaid expansion.

Josh Israel, ThinkProgress

MOProtest-638x287.jpg Protesters called on state lawmakers to expand Medicaid under the federal Affordable Care Act. (Credit: Missouri Progress) 

May 6, 2014 | More than 100 protesters and clergy members were removed from the Missouri Senate galleries on Tuesday, after they burst out into chants demanding the state accept Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion. Missouri is one of 24 states that has not yet accepted the more than $2 billion in federal funds available to the Show-Me state.

The Springfield (MO) News-Leader reported that the protesters shouted, “Medicaid Expansion! Do it now!” and “Missouri Senate expand Medicaid, bring dignity, do your jobs!” Capitol police reportedly removed more than 100 people and arrested 23 clergy, delaying the Senate’s session by nearly an hour.

Josh Israel is a senior investigative reporter for ThinkProgress.org at the Center for American Progress Action Fund. Previously, he was a reporter and oversaw money-in-politics reporting at the Center for Public Integrity, was chief researcher for Nick Kotz’s acclaimed 2005 book Judgment Days: Lyndon Baines Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., and the Laws that Changed America.

Full story … 

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