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Transformation of Community Policing Into Military Policing Sanctions Government Violence

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American lunacy, its out-of-control certainty that authorized violence has things under control. We need some kind of outside intervention. I fear the death of Andy Lopez in Santa Rosa won’t bring about the fundamental changes we need, any more than the tragedies that preceded it. We lack systems capable of holistic assessment of our problems; we lack systems that are not part of the problem.

Bob Koehler, BuzzFlash / Global Non-compliance

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images/dotoregon11_30.jpg 30/11/2013 | What goes around comes around . . . and around, and around.

 

Last month, the day after I left Santa Rosa, Calif., a 13-year-old boy carrying a toy replica of an AK-47 was shot and killed on the outskirts of that town by a Sonoma County deputy sheriff with a reputation for being trigger-happy. The officer had ordered the boy to drop the “gun,” then in a matter of two or three seconds opened fire, giving him no chance to comply.

This is not an isolated incident, which is why it’s yet one more tragedy I can’t get out of my mind — one more logical consequence of the simplistic militarism and mission creep that’s eating us alive. This is gun culture running unchecked from boyhood to manhood, permeating national policy both geopolitically and domestically. This is the trivialization of peace. It results in the ongoing murder of the innocent, both at home and abroad, at the hands of government as well as criminals and terrorists.

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Related:

When law enforcement is law and order’s biggest threat, Simon Maloy, Salon

  • The debacle in Ferguson represents a near-total breakdown of our civic institutions. Here's why that's so scary
  • All hell has broken loose. 
  • Cops Behaving Badly, June 28,2014

Ferguson report: Perversion of court system, rampant racism

  • The report is as appalling as it is important, and it should be required reading and study in criminal justice classes, especially for future police officers.
  • No time to read the whole DOJ report? Read my summary.
  • About that "Miracle"

Mary Turck, maryturck.com

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screen-shot-2015-03-10-at-8-16-24-pm.png?w=300&h=239Just about a week ago, the Department of Justice issued its scathing 102-page report detailing the racist and unconstitutional practices of Ferguson courts and cops. I read some of it at the gym, some on buses and trains, and finally finished it tonight. The report is as appalling as it is important, and it should be required reading and study in criminal justice classes, especially for future police officers. (Click here <> for full report.) 

Ferguson’s lessons go far beyond the abusive, racist police department. The first section in the report unmasks the collaboration of the court system and the police in raising revenue. That’s right — their primary objective is not law enforcement, but making money for the city.

Mary Turck is a writer, editor, and blogger. She is also the former editor of the TC Daily Planet and of the award-winning Connection to the Americas and AMERICAS.ORG and a recovering attorney.

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Related:

About that "Miracle" Mike Spangenberg, Question the Premise

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  • There are most certainly topics here (in Minneapolis)—tax policy, affordable housing, city planning—that are very much worth discussing.  But discussing them without exploring the history (and current reality) of racial oppression and exploitation isn't just incomplete; it’s dangerously deceptive, and almost miraculously self-perpetuating.
  • Justice and the Law, with MOA in Between
  • Truth and reconciliation is coming to America from the grassroots.

What I Learned From Breaking the Law

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  • In 1971, I helped burglarize an FBI office and leaked documents that exposed J. Edgar Hoover’s abuses of power. Here’s what that experience taught me.
  • Why Do We Fear Challenging Authority?

John Raines, the Nation

bonnie_john_raines_family_otu_img.jpgThe Raines family in Michigan, August 1969 (Photo courtesy of 1971)

Nation Editor’s Note: This lecture, given to the Society of Christian Ethics on January 10, 2015, is reprinted with the permission of the author.

I have been asked to develop a set of reflections on the moral lessons I learned from breaking the law. Here is part of that story. In 1961 I was arrested and put in jail in Little Rock, Arkansas. I was a “freedom rider.” Then, ten years later, a group of us calling ourselves “The Citizens’ Commission to Investigate the FBI” broke into the Media, Pennsylvania office of the FBI, removed the files and released them to the news media. What did I learn from breaking the law? Here are five lessons I learned. I learned that:

John Raines has taught in the Religion Department at Temple University for 45 years where he was voted "Honors Prof of the Year" in 2004 and was awarded a Lindbeck Distinguished Teaching award in 2008. In the 1960s, he was active in the civil rights movement as a freedom rider, a voter registration protestor and was part of the Selma march.

Full story … 

 

Related:

Why Do We Fear Challenging Authority? Robert J. Burrowes, Countercurrents.org 

  • I want to ask you three questions: Are you scared to make your own judgment (irrespective of the number of others, including experts, who make a similar judgment)? Are you scared to be labelled a 'conspiracy theorist' if you believe something contrary to the official (that is, the elite) narrative? And why?
  • How activism won real net neutrality

Justice and the Law, with MOA in Between

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And it is that (divorcing the law from justice) , fortified with the overpowering elixir of white privilege, that allows a white mayor, council, and attorney to snatch up the narrative of Dr. King, proclaim themselves self-anointed representatives of his legacy of justice, prosecute the same marginalized Black Americans Dr. King fought for for using the tactics he taught them and which they claim to lionize, and to sleep well at night, with the comforting knowledge that their souls are just.  After all, they’re just upholding the law.

About that "Miracle"

Mike Spangenberg, Question The Premise

static1.squarespace.com/static/53fa55ece4b045January 15, 2015 | By now you know that the city of Bloomington, Minnesota is choosing to prosecute organizers of a #BlackLivesMatter demonstration at Mall of America on December 20th.

 

I was there.  The demonstration was entirely peaceful.  Yet the mall and the city responded with ludicrously disproportionate force, including swarms of police officers in riot helmets and Orwellian electronic messages on giant screens.  Sandra Johnson, the City Attorney for Bloomington, not only wants to prosecute organizers of the event, but to try to recover money to pay for the city’s paranoid overreaction.

Mike Spangenberg: Father, husband. Justice and education and justice in education. Author: Question The Premise 

Full story … 

Related:

About that "Miracle" Mike Spangenberg, Question the Premise

  • There are most certainly topics here—tax policy, affordable housing, city planning—that are very much worth discussing.  But discussing them without exploring the history (and current reality) of racial oppression and exploitation isn't just incomplete; it’s dangerously deceptive, and almost miraculously self-perpetuating.
  • Truth and reconciliation is coming to America from the grassroots.

The disappeared: Chicago police detain Americans at abuse-laden 'black site'

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  • Exclusive: Secret interrogation facility reveals aspects of war on terror in US
  • ‘They disappeared us’: protester details 17-hour shackling without basic rights
  • Accounts describe police brutality, missing 15-year-old and one man’s death
  • Latest: Follow the Guardian’s investigation into Chicago’s Homan Square
  • LAPD officers shoot and kill homeless man after street altercation

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Chicago%20PD%27s%20Homan%20Square%20.jpgWhile US military and intelligence interrogation impacted people overseas, Homan Square – said to house military-style vehicles and even a cage – focuses on American citizens, most often poor, black and brown. ‘When you go in,’ Brian Jacob Church told the Guardian, ‘nobody knows what happened to you.’ Video: Phil Batta for the Guardian; editing: Mae Ryan

Spencer Ackerman, Guardian US

Tuesday 24 February 2015 The Chicago police department operates an off-the-books interrogation compound, rendering Americans unable to be found by family or attorneys while locked inside what lawyers say is the domestic equivalent of a CIA black site.

The facility, a nondescript warehouse on Chicago’s west side known as Homan Square, has long been the scene of secretive work by special police units. Interviews with local attorneys and one protester who spent the better part of a day shackled in Homan Square describe operations that deny access to basic constitutional rights.

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Spencer Ackerman is national security editor for Guardian US. A former senior writer for Wired, he won the 2012 National Magazine Award for Digital Reporting

Full story … 

Related:

LAPD officers shoot and kill homeless man after street altercation, Rory Carroll, Guardian US

  • A video taken by a passerby appears to show police officers wrestling the man to the ground before shots are heard.
  • Civilian oversight and other reforms have improved the LAPD’s fearsome image … (but) critics say the force remains prone to racism and unneccessary force.
  • Gaza in Arizona: The secret militarization of the U.S.-Mexico border

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