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Tom Toles | Letting Sanity Free / assets.amuniversal.com


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Special Coverage | The Trial of Chelsea Manning: Week of Aug 25, 2013

Reader Supported News, FireDogLake, Democracy Now!, Truthdig <>, National Public Radio (NPR), Bradley Manning Support Network, Consortium News

Roundup of Some of the Best Stories You Should Have Read About Chelsea Manning This Week

 

Bradley Manning’s Profoundly Moving Statement on ‘Paying the Price to Live in a Free Society'Kevin Gosztola, FireDogLake 

  • Wednesday August 21, 2013 | Following the announcement of Bradley Manning’s sentence of 35 years in military prison, Manning’s civilian defense attorney read a statement from Manning, which will be included in a filing requesting a pardon from President Barack Obama.
  • Coombs also described what Manning was like after the sentence was announced. He recounted how he and his other defense attorneys had been crying. Manning looked at him and said, “It’s okay. It’s alright. I know you did your best. I’m going to be okay. I’m going to get through this.” 

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Supporters stand outside the White House with a variety of signs showing support for U.S. Army Pfc. Chelsea Manning. (photo: Michelle Basch/WTOP) 

Amy Goodman | Manning Wronged and Miranda's Rights, Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan, Democracy Now!

  • 23 August 13 | There is not a flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people," wrote the late historian Howard Zinn, author of "A People's History of the United States."
  • These words were included in a statement by Pfc. Bradley Manning, read by his defense attorney David Coombs, at a press conference following Manning's sentencing to 35 years in military prison for releasing hundreds of thousands of documents to the whistle-blower website WikiLeaks. 

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Chris Hedges | Bradley Manning and the Gangster State, Chris Hedges, Truthdig

22 August 13 | The swift and brutal verdict read out by Army Col. Judge Denise Lind in sentencing Pfc. Bradley Manning to 35 years in prison means we have become a nation run by gangsters. It signals the inversion of our moral and legal order, the death of an independent media, and the open and flagrant misuse of the law to prevent any oversight or investigation of official abuses of power, including war crimes. The passivity of most of the nation's citizens - the most spied upon, monitored and controlled population in human history - to the judicial lynching of Manning means they will be next.

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Bill Simpich | It Will Take a New Antiwar Movement to Free Bradley Manning, Bill Simpich, Reader Supported News

22 August 13 | Bradley Manning was sentenced today to 35 years. Now his case enters the political arena. His supporters all wore matching shirts for the cameras, emblazoned with a call for Obama to pardon Manning. What will it take to make that a realistic possibility? 

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Bradley Manning: 'Everything is Going to Be OK', Scott Galindez, Reader Supported News

  • 21 August 13 | Bradley Manning, moments after being sentenced to 35 years in prison, turned to his attorney David Coombs and told him, "It's okay ... I'm okay, everything is going to be okay." Coombs said it was the first time a client had cheered him up after a verdict. As the verdict was read, Coombs' wife wept while Manning's aunt and cousin showed no visible emotion.
  • The courtroom erupted with chants of "Bradley, we are with you" and "We will keep fighting for you." As Manning exited the courtroom, the last voice he heard was Medea Benjamin shouting: "We love you." 

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Defense Asks Judge to Let Bradley Manning Have a Life, Mark Memmott, NPR

21 August 13 | Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, who was responsible for the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history, was sentenced by a military judge to 35 years in prison Wednesday, according to reporters covering the trial at Fort Meade, MD. He'll get about 3 1/2 years' credit for time he's already spent behind bars. 

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Defense Asks Judge to Let Bradley Manning Have a Life, Nathan Fuller, Bradley Manning Support Network

19 August 13 | On the final day of litigation in Bradley Manning's court martial, we saw a government dead set on persecuting a whistle-blower to deter those who he might inspire, and a defense intent on salvaging the young soldier's future. 

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America's Upside-Down Morality, Robert Parry, Consortium News

15 August 13 | Having covered the U.S. government for nearly 36 years, I am not so naïve as to expect perfection or even anything close. But there are times when the immoral dimensions of Official Washington stand out in the starkest shades, not in variations of gray but in black and white. 

 

Section(s): 

Obama DOJ Asks Court to Grant Immunity to George W. Bush For Iraq War

  • "The DOJ claims that in planning and waging the Iraq War, ex-President Bush and key members of his Administration were acting within the legitimate scope of their employment and are thus immune from suit,” chief counsel Inder Comar of Comar Law said.
  • The Judicial Lynching of Bradley Manning

 

David Swanson and Inder Comar, WarIsACrime.org

 

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(Aug. 20, 2013) — In court papers filed today (PDF), the United States Department of Justice requested that George W. Bush, Richard Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, Colin Powell, Condoleezza Rice and Paul Wolfowitz be granted procedural immunity in a case alleging that they planned and waged the Iraq War in violation of international law.

 

Plaintiff Sundus Shaker Saleh, an Iraqi single mother and refugee now living in Jordan, filed a complaint in March 2013 in San Francisco federal court alleging that the planning and waging of the war constituted a “crime of aggression” against Iraq, a legal theory that was used by the Nuremberg Tribunal to convict Nazi war criminals after World War II.

Full story…

Related:

The Judicial Lynching of Bradley Manning, Chris Hedges, Truthdig

The First Amendment is dead. There is no legal mechanism left to challenge the crimes of the power elite. We are bound and shackled. And those individuals who dare to resist face the prospect, if they remain in the country, of joining Manning in prison, perhaps the last refuge for the honest and the brave.

 

Special Coverage | The Trial of Bradley Manning: Week of Aug 18, 2013

Reader Supported News, FireDogLake, Consortium News, USA Today

Roundup of Some of the Best Stories You Should Have Read About Bradley Manning This WeekKevin GosztolaFireDogLake

  • Saturday August 17, 2013 | The trial of Pfc. Bradley Manning will finally conclude next week, as the military judge at Fort Meade issues a sentencing verdict.
  • Earlier this week, Manning took the witness stand to deliver a statement to Judge Army Col. Denise Lind after sitting through testimony from his sister and two psychologists, which had clearly shaken him up.
  • I’d like to take a moment now to highlight some of the stories on the major day of proceedings on Wednesday that everyone should be reading. This is also a tribute to the few reporters, who have consistently shown up to the gates of Fort Meade daily to cover the trial whether there was a guarantee there would be “breaking news” or not.
  • [Note: All selected writings or reports are from people who actually were present at Fort Meade during proceedings.]

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America's Upside-Down Morality, Robert Parry, Consortium News

15 August 13 | Having covered the U.S. government for nearly 36 years, I am not so naïve as to expect perfection or even anything close. But there are times when the immoral dimensions of Official Washington stand out in the starkest shades, not in variations of gray but in black and white. 

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Scott Galindez | An Apology to Bradley Manning, Scott Galindez, Reader Supported News 

15 August 13 | Here is my reply to Bradley Manning's apology … line by line. Bradley's words in bold.

  • First, Your Honor, I want to start off with an apology.
  • First of all Bradley, it is the court, the Army, and the American people that should be apologizing to you. We failed you, not the other way around.
  • I'm sorry. I'm sorry that my actions hurt people. 

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Manning Apologizes for Any Harm Done By His Actions, Scott Galindez, Reader Supported News

15 August 13 | Bradley Manning took the stand and made an unsworn statement during the sentencing phase of his trial. At times he appeared to be struggling to control his emotions. Sounding nervous, he turned to the judge:
First, Your Honor, I want to start off with an apology. I'm sorry. I'm sorry that my actions hurt people. I'm sorry that it hurt the United States. At the time of my decisions, as you know, I was dealing with a lot of issues, issues that are ongoing, and are continuing to affect me. 

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Petition Backs Pfc. Manning for Nobel Peace Prize, USA Today

13 August 13 | pacifist group has submitted a petition signed by 100,000 people online in support of awarding the Nobel Peace Prize to U.S. soldier Bradley Manning, who was convicted of espionage for disclosing classified war information to WikiLeaks.The Bradley Manning Support Network was very critical of the leaked video, pointing out that the March leak of Manning's one hour testimony was accompanied by a statement in which the leaker took full responsibility and stated that no organization was behind that leak. The Army is still investigating and to date has not made an arrest. 

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Scott Galindez | Manning Defense Exposes a Dysfunctional Chain of Command, Scott Galindez, Reader Supported News 

12 August 13 | Bradley Manning's defense team called their first sentencing phase witnesses on Monday but not before Judge Lind addressed a video that shows the inside of the courtroom. The video, which opens with the voice of Daniel Ellsberg and closes with supporters chanting "Free Bradley Manning," was apparently recorded in the public overflow trailer. The judge announced that security measures in the public entrance would be increased. She also thanked most of the media and the public for following the rules.The Bradley Manning Support Network was very critical of the leaked video, pointing out that the March leak of Manning's one hour testimony was accompanied by a statement in which the leaker took full responsibility and stated that no organization was behind that leak. The Army is still investigating and to date has not made an arrest. 

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Video Footage of Courtroom Leaked, Scott Galindez, Reader Supported News

  • 12 August 13 11:35 AM | The video () which opens with the voice of Daniel Ellsberg and closes with supporters chanting Free Bradley Manning was determined to be recorded in the public overflow trailer. The Judge announced that security measure in the public entrance would be increased. She also thanked most of the media and the public for following the rules.
  • The Bradley Manning Support Network was very critical of the leaked video pointing out that the the March leaker of Manning's one hour testimony was accompanied by a statement in which the leaker took full responsibility and stated that no organization was behind that leak. The Army is still investigating the March leak and to date has not made an arrest.
  • Many on twitter feared the Judge would place more restrictions on the media.
  • The latest footage was published online by Asher Wolf, the pseudonym used by an Australian activist-journalist. In an interview with The Daily Telegraph, Ms Wolf defended herself against the Twitter backlash, warning Manning supporters not to "shoot the messenger".
  • "If they do shut down the press pool it would be indicative of the state of freedom of press in America. No journalist should have to fear the simple act of doing their job," she said, adding that the footage gave the public their first look inside the court during a "historic case".

 

 

Section(s): 

America’s Disappeared

  • In America, when you are poor, you can instantly disappear like this into the subterranean rabbit holes of our vast jail and prison complex.
  • Rise Up or Die

Chris Hedges, Truthdig

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A guard walks past prisoner cells at a Connecticut Supermax facility in 2001.  AP/Steve Miller

Aug 12, 2013 | Big Frankie, Little Frankie and Al, three black men who spent a lot of time in prison and have put their lives back together in the face of joblessness, crushing poverty and the violence of city streets, abruptly stopped appearing at the prison support group I help run at the Second Presbyterian Church in Elizabeth, N.J. This happens in poor neighborhoods. You see people. You make plans to see them again. And then without explanation they vanish. They get arrested for something, often trivial, after the police randomly stop them, run a check and find they owe fines, missed a court date or a meeting with a probation officer, owe child support, violated probation or have a couple of ounces of pot. The big mechanical jaw of the legal system gulps them down. And since they are poor and cannot afford bail they stay locked up. And that appears to be what happened to Big Frankie, Little Frankie and Al.

The rumor on the street is that Little Frankie, whose name is Frank Clarke and who is of Hispanic descent, did not appear for a court date because he was afraid of being deported. But no one is sure, except about the being afraid part. The Union County Jail in Elizabeth says Big Frankie and Al were arrested for “possession of controlled dangerous substances.” But this does not mean they had drugs. They might have. But they might not have. Police plant drugs all the time. And if Big Frankie and Al did have drugs they did not have very much.

Full story…

Related:

Rise Up or Die, Chris Hedges, Truthdig

A handful of corporate oligarchs around the globe have everything—wealth, power and privilege—and the rest of us struggle as part of a vast underclass, increasingly impoverished and ruthlessly repressed. There is one set of laws and regulations for us; there is another set of laws and regulations for a power elite that functions as a global mafia.

 

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