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Education Ruling: OK To Shut Out Disabled Kids?

Frightening is the underlying notion that the level of societal expenditures on an individual ought Beyond that, this notion could lead to a termination of benefits for the elderly, as well as the disabled. It is a notion out of the selfish and stern philosophy of Ayn Rand.

We must, as a society, reject such an approach. We need to focus on unlocking the potential of all our citizens. We need to focus on the contributions made by each of our neighbors. Only by helping those most in need can we create a just society.

Andrew Feinstein, Hartford (CT) Courant

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September 10, 2016 | Judge Thomas Moukawsher issued a monumental ruling Wednesday in the case of Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding v. Rell, finding that Connecticut's system of funding education is irrational and unconstitutional. As to his basic findings, Judge Moukawsher is to be applauded.

The excellent decision came, however, containing a very dark poison. Judge Moukawsher proposed that certain children with severe disabilities be denied a public education. He says, "The call is not about whether certain profoundly disabled children are entitled to a 'free appropriate public education.' It is about whether schools can decide in an education plan for a covered child that the child has a minimal or no chance for education, and therefore the school should not make expensive, extensive, and ultimately pro-forma efforts." He claims, inaccurately, that "no case holds otherwise, and this means that extensive services are not always required."

Andrew Feinstein of Mystic is a lawyer with a particular focus on special education.

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A former Marine was fired as a W.Va. police officer after failing to shoot somebody

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Even though he was just 24 when West Virginia Police Department hired him, Stephen Mader was already a bonafide hero — one of the good guys. (Staff Sgt. Brian Buckwalter/U.S. Marines  

Shaun King, New York (NY) Daily News 

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http://cdn.thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/30163700/Police-Have-Not-Been-Held-Accountable3-1125x635.jpg Tuesday, September 13, 2016 | On July 24, 2015, the Weirton, W.Va., Police Department announced the hiring of three new officers for the force. All three men were celebrated for bringing some much needed youth to an aging department in the sleepy rural city 35 miles outside of Pittsburgh.

Zach Springer was just 20.

Adam Mortimer was 21.

And the old head among them was Stephen Mader, who was 24.

Shaun King: Senior Justice Writer for the New York (NY) Daily News

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Innocent? Don't talk to the police.

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Don’t talk to the police—except to tell them, respectfully, that you will not answer any questions and that you would like a lawyer.

James Duane, Los Angeles (CA) Times

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http://www.trbimg.com/img-57bf6fce/turbine/la-1472163875-snap-photo/400/16x9 Kash Register begins to cry after realizing he'll be freed after spending 34 years in prison for a crime he didn't commit, in Los Angeles in Superior Court in Nov. 2013. (Los Angeles Times)

August 26, 2016 | Someday soon, when you least expect it, a police officer may receive mistaken information from a confused eyewitness or a liar, or circum­stantial evidence that helps persuade him that you might be guilty of a very serious crime. When confronted with police officers and other government agents who suddenly arrive with a bunch of questions, most innocent people mistakenly think to themselves, “Why not talk? I haven’t done anything. I have nothing to hide. What could pos­sibly go wrong?”

 

Well, among other things, you could end up confessing to a crime you didn’t commit. The problem of false confessions is not an urban legend. It is a documented fact. Indeed, research suggests that the innocent may be more susceptible than the culpable to deceptive police interrogation tactics, because they tragically assume that somehow “truth and justice will prevail” later even if they falsely admit their guilt. Nobody knows for sure how often innocent people make false confessions, but as Circuit Judge Alex Kozinski recently observed, “Innocent interrogation subjects confess with surprising frequency.”

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James Duane is a professor at Regent Law School in Virginia Beach, Va. This essay is adapted from his book “You Have the Right to Remain Innocent,” forthcoming from Little A in September.

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Related:

Book review |‘ Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption’ ~ Bryan Stevenson, Rob Warden, Washington (DC) Post

  • Criminal justice in America sometimes seems more criminal than just — replete with error, malfeasance, racism and cruel, if not unusual, punishment, coupled with stubborn resistance to reform and a failure to learn from even its most glaring mistakes. And nowhere, let us pray, are matters worse than in the hard Heart of Dixie, a.k.a. Alabama, the adopted stomping ground of Bryan Stevenson, champion of the damned.
  • Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption | Ebook PDF Free Download
  • Prison Without Punishment

Jailing Rape and Domestic Violence Victims Is An Abuse of Prosecutors' Power

  • Jailing victims of sexual assault and domestic violence to compel their participation in prosecution is simply wrong. The practice must stop.
  • Related: Furor grows over sentencing in a college rape case

Leigh Goodmark, Feministing

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https://cdn.psychologytoday.com/sites/default/files/styles/article-inline-half/public/blogs/883/2014/02/143232-144579.jpg?itok=3Cv3Iia8February August, 2016 | When prosecutors ask judges to jail people, we assume that it’s because the person has committed some crime and is so dangerous that the person should not be out among the public. We hope that prosecutors will balance their pursuit of justice against the costs of prosecution to the victim and witnesses involved. We trust that prosecutors understand the tremendous power that they wield and use it wisely.

What we don’t expect is that prosecutors will use their powers to jail victims of violent crimes in order to secure their testimony, without regard to the impact on the victim. But prosecutors exercise this power every day in domestic violence and rape cases.

Leigh Goodmark: Professor, University of Marland Carey School of Law

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Related:

Furor grows over sentencing in a college rape case, Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

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  • The California judge who meted out what many consider a light, six-month sentence with probation to a former Stanford swimmer convicted of a campus rape now faces a recall led by a law professor there. Meanwhile, the defendant’s father, seeking to support his son during sentencing, outraged many even further during sentencing by characterizing the rape as merely “20 minutes of action."
  • Prosecutors said Brock Turner never accepted responsibility for the assault. His six-month sentence could be reduced to three for good behavior. As part of his sentencing, he will be required to register as a sex offender for the rest of his life.
  • Part 1: Judge in Stanford sexual assault case faces recall effort over light sentence
  • Part 2: Telling the Story of the Stanford Rape Case

Copspeak: 7 Ways Journalists Use Police Jargon to Obscure the Truth

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  • The close relationship between reporters and police is often marked by diffusion of language from the police PR team to the front page. In the wake of the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, here are some examples of how “copspeak” — or jargon used by police departments — is internalized by journalists covering police violence, and how it affects the public’s perception of crime and police brutality.
  • Related: Media Is Everywhere, But Real Journalism Is Dying

Adam Johnson, Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR)

July 11, 2016 | 1. “Officer-involved shooting”http://fair.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/OfficerInvolvedShooting-e1468266009910.png

Probably the most popular and most frequently criticized example of copspeak, “officer-involved shooting” is a textbook example of what Robert Jay Lifton called a “thought-terminating cliche.” It describes an act of violence without assigning blame and is almost never used for when a police officer is the victim, only when the police have shot someone — justified or not.

By describing an event alongside the person who did it without connecting the two, “officer-involved shooting” vaguely alludes to what happened without the emotional response this would normally evoke. “Such phraseology,” Orwell wrote in “Politics and the English Language,” “is needed if one wants to name things without calling up mental pictures of them.”

Adam Johnson is a contributing analyst for Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR).

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http://riseuptimes.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/images.jpg?w=225 Media Is Everywhere, But Real Journalism Is Dying, Dan Tynan, Quora / Huffington Post

  • Watch the movie Spotlight. That kind of journalism hasn’t disappeared entirely. But it’s more and more rare, and one day it very well might. And no one will be left to report that story.
  • Related: The Media Is Enabling Trump’s Divide-And-Conquer Strategy

 

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