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In Arbitration, a 'Privatization of the Justice System'

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Over the last 10 years, thousands of businesses across the country -- from big corporations to storefront shops -- have used arbitration to create an alternate system of justice. There, rules tend to favor businesses, and judges and juries have been replaced by arbitrators who commonly consider the companies their clients, The Times found.

Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Michael Corkery, New York (NY) Times

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Debbie%20Brenner.jpgDebbie Brenner, whose fraud case against a for-profit school chain was forced into arbitration and left her nearly bankrupt.

November 1, 2015 | Deborah L. Pierce, an emergency room doctor in Philadelphia, was optimistic when she brought a sex discrimination claim against the medical group that had dismissed her. Respected by colleagues, she said she had a stack of glowing evaluations and evidence that the practice had a pattern of denying women partnerships.

She began to worry, though, once she was blocked from court and forced into private arbitration.

Presiding over the case was not a judge but a corporate lawyer, Vasilios J. Kalogredis, who also handled arbitrations. When Dr. Pierce showed up one day for a hearing, she said she noticed Mr. Kalogredis having a friendly coffee with the head of the medical group she was suing.

Jessica Silver-Greenberg is a reporter at the New York Times covering banking and consumer finance. 

Michael Corkery is a Reporter at The New York Times. covering banking and finance. 

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Schoolkids in Handcuffs

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  • The Justice Department (has made) it clear that federal law requires districts to create disciplinary policies that do not have the effect of criminalizing and discriminating against children with disabilities. What’s really alarming is that this kind of illegal treatment is not uncommon in schools all over the country.
  • Special Project | The War on Children: Week Ending September 12, 2015

Editorial Board, New York (NY) Times

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http://static01.nyt.com/images/2015/11/04/opinion/04wed1/04wed1-blog427.jpg Credit Anthony Russo

Nov. 4, 2015 | The video that went viral last month showing a white sheriff’s deputy in a Columbia, S.C., classroom throwing and dragging an African-American student across the floor may well be indicative of a deeper problem with the security program in that school district.

In May, an office within the Justice Department that monitors federally funded programs opened an investigation to determine whether the school security program run by the Richland County, S.C., Sheriff’s Department was complying with federal civil rights law. Although the department has not made public any details, such investigations typically result from civil rights complaints or evidence suggesting discrimination in the way that suspension, expulsion and other disciplinary measures are being applied.

The New York Times Editorial Board is composed of 19 journalists with wide-ranging areas of expertise. Their primary responsibility is to write The Times’s editorials, which represent the voice of the board, its editor and the publisher.

Full story … 

Related:

Special Project | The War on Children: Week Ending September 12, 2015, Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

  • The United States is one of the few countries in the world that puts children in supermax prisons, tries them as adults, incarcerates them for exceptionally long periods of time, defines them as super predators, pepper sprays them for engaging in peaceful protests, and, in an echo of the discourse of the war on terror, describes them as 'teenage time bombs.' 
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    • Teen stripped of National Honor Society position because she dared wear a sun dress—in Florida
    • Utah high school decides not to include special needs students in yearbook
    • The only thing shameful about 'revealing' prom dresses are adults who obsess over them
    • The absent black father myth—debunked by CDC

 

The Supreme Court Is About To Consider A Case That Could End Roe V. Wade

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  • Eight months from now, Roe v. Wade could be dead.
  • The Ungodly, Destructive Power of the Citizens United Decision

Ian Millhiser, Think Progress 

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http://cdn.thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/10114824/AP_931208042-1024x668.jpg Nov 10, 2015 | Eight months from now, Roe v. Wade could be dead.

On Friday, the Supreme Court will consider whether to hear two cases involving ambitious state laws seeking to restrict — or even eliminate — access to abortion. This is actually the second week in a row that the justices will discuss whether to hear these cases, Currier v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization and Whole Woman’s Health v. Cole, although the Court’s recent practice has been to discuss a case during at least two conferences before announcing that the Court will take the case. If the justices agree to hear either or both cases, they could announce this fact as soon as Friday afternoon.

Ian Millhiser is a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress Action Fund and the Editor of ThinkProgress Justice. Ian's first book is Injustices: The Supreme Court's History of Comforting the Comfortable and Afflicting the Afflicted.

Full story … 

Related:

The Ungodly, Destructive Power of the Citizens United Decision, Charles P. Pierce, Esquire 

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  • What are the gobshites saying these days?
  • Being our semi-regular weekly survey of the state of Our National Dialogue which, as you know, is what Butch Hancock would have come up with, had he composed "Derp Road Song."
  • This Just In: We Are Officially in a New Gilded Age

 

The Ungodly, Destructive Power of the Citizens United Decision

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Politics%20Banner.jpg

  • What are the gobshites saying these days?
  • Being our semi-regular weekly survey of the state of Our National Dialogue which, as you know, is what Butch Hancock would have come up with, had he composed "Derp Road Song."
  • This Just In: We Are Officially in a New Gilded Age

Charles P. Pierce, Esquire

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Oct 12, 2015 | We have a great deal of fun here with certain elements of the content provided by The New York Times—coughDowdcoughBrookscoughDouthatcough—but there are times in which the NYT reminds us that there is one thing it does better than any other newspaper. It can be The New York Times. Over the weekend, courtesy of a team of three NYT reporters, we had one of those moments.

Just 158 families, along with companies they own or control, contributed $176 million in the first phase of the campaign, a New York Times investigation found. Not since before Watergate have so few people and businesses provided so much early money in a campaign, most of it through channels legalized by the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision five years ago.

Charles P. Pierce is a staff writer for Grantland and the author of Idiot America. He writes regularly for Esquire, is the lead writer for Esquire.com’s Politics blog, and is a frequent guest on NPR.

Full Story … 

http://www.globalresearch.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/american_oligarchy.jpg Related:

This Just In: We Are Officially in a New Gilded Age, Justin Miller, American Prospect

  • Just 158 families have contributed nearly half of all the money raised so far for the numerous presidential campaigns. Not surprisingly, these donors are overwhelmingly white, male, old, Republican, and rich—very, very rich. 
  • Jimmy Carter: The US Is an "Oligarchy With Unlimited Political Bribery."
  • Democracy Doesn’t Exist: Here’s Why Voting Doesn’t Change Anything.

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