You are here

Law & Justice

Law & Justice Logo

Charles Pierce | The 35-Year-Old Georgia Mother Who Was Shot and Killed by Police

Rights%20%26%20Liberties%20Banner.jpg

  • Pierce writes: "This has been a long year already regarding the phenomenon of how police come to kill the people they are sworn to serve. The places are established and iconic - Ferguson, Baltimore, the first bad scene in Charleston." 
  • The tragic story of Caroline Small, a name you need to know.
  • 15 Things Your City Can Do Right Now To End Police Brutality
  • The Not-So-Great White North

Charles Pierce, Esquire

landscape-1436966461-ajcstory.jpgJul 15, 2015This has been a long year already regarding the phenomenon of how police come to kill the people they are sworn to serve. The places are established and iconic—Ferguson, Baltimore, the first bad scene in Charleston. On Tuesday, the family of Eric Garner, who was choked to death for the crime of selling loose cigarettes, came to a settlement with the city of New York. In all of these cases, of course, race acted as what the arson-squad people call an accelerant to the largely justified outrage that followed the killings. But the problem of cops killing citizens is more vast than that, as an outbreak of actual journalism down in Atlanta has proven.

Working with a local television station, Brad Schrade of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution examines the extremely aromatic five-year old case of Caroline Small, a 35-year-old mother of two who was shot and killed by two police officers in Glynn County, a warren of small towns along the Georgia coast. It is a perfect case study of the problems with police culture in this country—most notably, the near impossibility of getting the justice system to deal with police who kill people. It is a true American horror story.

Charles Pierce is a staff writer for Grantland and the author of Idiot America. He writes regularly for Esquire, is the lead writer for Esquire.com’s Politics blog, and is a frequent guest on NPR.

Full story … 

Related:

15 Things Your City Can Do Right Now To End Police Brutality, Zak Cheney-Rice, Mic.com

Police%20Line%20at%20Rally.jpg

How, besides protesting, can we actually make sure no more black people are killed, beaten or tortured by the police? And how can we promote justice and equity in law enforcement more generally? The Center for Popular Democracy and Policy Link have partnered with various protesters and street-level organizers to find some concrete solutions to this problem.

###

The Not-So-Great White North, Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

  • Black people in Minneapolis are 8.7 times more likely to be arrested for a low-level offense than white people; Native Americans are 8.6 times more likely than whites to be subject to such an arrest. Here’s a new report chronicling one city’s so-far failed efforts to ease racialized policing.
  • Part 1: Picking up the Pieces
  • Part 2: Being Black in America

15 Things Your City Can Do Right Now To End Police Brutality

Police%20Line%20at%20Rally.jpg

How, besides protesting, can we actually make sure no more black people are killed, beaten or tortured by the police? And how can we promote justice and equity in law enforcement more generally? The Center for Popular Democracy and Policy Link have partnered with various protesters and street-level organizers to find some concrete solutions to this problem.

Zak Cheney-Rice, Mic.com

twitter-4-512.pngNow you can follow Evergreene Digest on Twitter.

 

hewas12_0.jpg?itok=e47M8r4GArtist Denise Miller's art work in response to police violence against Black and Brown bodies Denise Miller

Jul 1, 2015 | Martin Luther King Jr. said it best in 1966: "[The] law cannot make a man love me, but it can restrain him from lynching me, and I think that's pretty important also."

Two years later, he was shot and killed in Memphis. But his dream that the United States legal system might eventually overcome its racial biases and serve its non-white citizens equally lives on.

For months now, politicians have invoked King's legacy to implore black citizens to stay peaceful in the face of routine violence. The irony of this plea seems lost on its askers, but it does fall in line with a question that's haunted Black Lives Matter protesters for the past 10 months, namely, "What's going to happen next?"

Zak Cheney-Rice is a Senior Staff Writer at Mic.

Full story … 

Related:

40 Reasons US Jails And Prisons Are Full Of Black And Poor People, Bill Quigley, Countercurrents.org

Rights%20%26%20Liberties%20Banner.jp

What does it say about our society that it uses its jails and prisons as the primary detention facilities for poor and black and brown people who have been racially targeted and jail them with the mentally ill and chemically dependent?

Minnesota crime is at a 50-year low. So why are we imprisoning more people than ever?

Rights%20%26%20Liberties%20Banner.jpg

  • For all the expenses associated with imprisoning more Minnesotans, it doesn’t appear to be paying off. According to the Brennan Center, incarceration isn’t responsible for driving down crime. The study attributes the national decline to factors such as decreased alcohol consumption, growth of income and the introduction of advanced statistic-based crime-fighting tactics.
  • 40 Reasons US Jails And Prisons Are Full Of Black And Poor People

Andy Mannix, MinnPost

stillwater-inmates_916.jpgMinnesota's rising prison population has already exceeded capacity. Courtesy of the Minnesota Department of Corrections

06/24/15 | In 2013, something remarkable happened in New Jersey.

After reforming its drug policies and rethinking its practice of throwing ex-cons back into state correctional facilities for parole violations, the state saw its prison population drop to 19,528, the lowest point in two decades, and a 28 percent decline from its late '90s peak.

That same year, in stark contrast, Minnesota's prison population hit one of the highest levels in its history.

Andy Mannix is an investigative/data reporter for MinnPost, covering criminal justice, public policy and many other topics.

Full story … 

Related:


 

I%20Want%20You.jpgIf you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.


 

40 Reasons US Jails And Prisons Are Full Of Black And Poor People, Bill Quigley, Countercurrents.org

What does it say about our society that it uses its jails and prisons as the primary detention facilities for poor and black and brown people who have been racially targeted and jail them with the mentally ill and chemically dependent?

 

40 Reasons US Jails And Prisons Are Full Of Black And Poor People

Rights%20%26%20Liberties%20Banner.jpg

What does it say about our society that it uses its jails and prisons as the primary detention facilities for poor and black and brown people who have been racially targeted and jail them with the mentally ill and chemically dependent?

Bill Quigley, Countercurrents

justice190v.jpg03 June, 2015 | The US Department of Justice (DOJ) reports 2.2 million people are in our nation's jails and prisons and another 4.5 million people are on probation or parole in the US, totaling 6.8 million people, one of every 35 adults.  We are far and away the world leader in putting our own people in jail.  Most of the people inside are poor and Black.  Here are 40 reasons why.

One.  It is not just about crime.  Our jails and prisons have grown from holding about 500,000 people in 1980 to 2.2 million today.  The fact is that crime rates have risen and fallen independently of our growing incarceration rates.

Bill Quigley is Associate Director of the Center for Constitutional Rights and a law professor at Loyola University New Orleans.  He is a Katrina survivor and has been active in human rights in Haiti for years. He volunteers with the Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti (IJDH) and the Bureau de Avocats Internationaux (BAI) in Port au Prince. 

Full story … 

Related:



Subscribe%20logo.jpgTo stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest.

 

 



lead_large.jpg?GE2DGMBUGM2DMNRXFYYA====A photograph taken by the Baltimore City Police Department during the civil disturbances in April 1968. (James V. Kelly/Langsdale Library Special Collections)

1968 and the Invention of the American Police State, Daniel Denvir, City Lab  / The Marshall Project

  • Baltimore's 1968 Holy Week Uprising was quite different from the events of this week. But the response to it helped set the stage for Freddie Gray.
  • Juan González on Walter Scott Shooting: When Will the Police Killings of Black Males Stop?

Full story ... 

The Not-So-Great White North

https://www.aclu.org/sites/default/files/styles/scale_1200w/public/

  • Black people in Minneapolis are 8.7 times more likely to be arrested for a low-level offense than white people; Native Americans are 8.6 times more likely than whites to be subject to such an arrest. Here’s a new report chronicling one city’s so-far failed efforts to ease racialized policing.
  • Part 1: Picking up the Pieces
  • Part 2: Being Black in America

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest



Part 1: Picking up the Pieces

A Minneapolis Case Study

American Civil Liberties Union / The Marshall Project

May 28, 2015 | When Officer Rod Webber quickly approached the car that Hamza Jeylani was sitting in, the 17-year-old hit record on his cell phone. Moments earlier, Jeylani and three friends were pulled over by the officer after making a U-turn in a church parking lot in South Minneapolis after playing basketball at the local YMCA. After Jeylani and two friends were ordered out of the car, Webber threatened Jeylani as he handcuffed him.

“Plain and simple, if you fuck with me,” says Webber on the video, “I’m going to break your legs before you get the chance to run.” “Can you tell me why I’m being arrested?” asks Jeylani. “Because I feel like arresting you,” replies Webber.

American Civil Liberties Union: For almost 100 years, the ACLU has worked to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States.

Full story … 



I%20Want%20You.jpg If you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.



Part 2: Being Black in America

Minnesota has perfected the art of suppressing and subjugating people of color.

American Civil Liberties Union / The Marshall Project

ACLU%20Video%20%7C%20Being%20Black%20in%20America.jpg“Picking Up the Pieces — Policing in America, a Minneapolis Case Study” digs into the data the ACLU received from the police department and explores the who, what, when, where, why, and how of low-level arrests occurring in a city known for its affluence and liberal politics over 33 months. The report also recommends reforms to begin the process of improving police-community relations and ensure that all Minneapolitans are policed fairly.

"We've become the new South,” warns Anthony Newby. “We've become the new premiere example of how to systematically oppress people of color. And again, it's done through our legal system, and so low-level offenses, as an example, are just one of the many, many ways that Minnesota has perfected the art of suppressing and subjugating people of color."

American Civil Liberties Union: For almost 100 years, the ACLU has worked to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States.

Full story (video and transcript) … 

Pages