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Pavel Constantin | Wikileaks / CagleCartoons.com

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Reactions To FCC Net Neutrality Proposal Mixed

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  • Response to the proposal as it stands has been far from unanimous praise. Initial excitement that the matter had been officially introduced at all was quickly subsumed by wariness over ambiguities in the proposal that seemed to allow broadband carriers to continue their old practices under the cover of a false openness.
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  • Why The Federal Trade Commission' s (FTC's) Online Privacy Plan Won't Stop The Information Free-For-All
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Amy Lee, Huffington Post

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FFC Chair Julius Genachowski

For the tech community, net neutrality is the byword for a free and open Internet. So the Federal Communication Committee's announcement that they would introduce regulations to protect net neutrality came as a welcome relief.

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But response to the proposal as it stands has been far from unanimous praise. Initial excitement that the matter had been officially introduced at all was quickly subsumed by wariness over ambiguities in the proposal that seemed to allow broadband carriers to continue their old practices under the cover of a false openness.

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Why The Federal Trade Commission' s (FTC's) Online Privacy Plan Won't Stop The Information Free-For-All, Bianca Bosker, Huffington Post
The Federal Trade Commission's new proposal to protect our privacy online should do little to assuage your fears of a know-it-all Web watching, tracking and responding to your activities on the Internet.

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War News Unfit for Print

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  • Wikileaks’ Iraq War Logs revelations are clearer outside the United States.
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  • 'There is much less of a focus on the aspects of the leaks that make the U.S. look bad,' says Jim Naureckas of Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR).
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  • Wikileaks Exposes Complicity of the (US) Press
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Andrew Oxford, In These Times

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When five news organizations—The New York Times, The Guardian, Le Monde, Der Spiegel and Al Jazeera—were granted access to Wikileaks’ Iraq War Logs before they were published online on October 22, only The Times avoided drawing the same conclusions as its colleagues abroad. The Guardian’s coverage featured headlines such as “Secret Files Show How U.S. Ignored Torture” and “How Friendly Fire Became Routine,” while Le Monde was no less dramatic. Der Spiegel, the German news weekly, published a lengthy editorial titled, “Dumb War: Taking Stock of the Iraq Invasion,” which concluded that the Wikileaks documents confirm that the war was a failure.

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Meanwhile, The Times’ front-page headline assured us “Detainees Fared Worse in Iraqi Hands.” Other American newspapers seemed similarly unimpressed by Wikileaks’ latest publication of nearly 400,000 classified military documents. The Washington Post printed an editorial declaring that the Iraq War Logs offered no new insights.

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Wikileaks Exposes Complicity of the Press, Gareth Porter, CounterPunch
Documents Show New York Times and Washington Post Shilling for US Government on Iran Missile "Threat"

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Wikileaks Exposes Complicity of the Press

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Documents Show New York Times and Washington Post Shilling for US Government on Iran Missile "Threat"

Gareth Porter, CounterPunch

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A diplomatic cable from last February released by Wikileaks provides a detailed account of how Russian specialists on the Iranian ballistic missile program refuted the U.S. suggestion that Iran has missiles that could target European capitals or intends to develop such a capability.

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In fact, the Russians challenged the very existence of the mystery missile the U.S. claims Iran acquired from North Korea.

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But readers of the two leading U.S. newspapers never learned those key facts about the document.

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On Korea, Here We Go Again

If American journalism should have learned one thing over the years, it is to be cautious and skeptical during the first days of a foreign confrontation like the one now playing out on the Korean Peninsula. Often the initial accounts from the “U.S. side” don’t turn out to be entirely accurate.

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Robert Parry, consortiumnews.com

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While you can delve back through history for plenty of examples, today’s U.S. journalists might remember events like the Gulf of Tonkin clash that opened the door to the disastrous Vietnam War and the misplaced certainty about Iraq’s WMD that led to a bloody U.S. invasion and occupation.

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In both cases, contrary claims from the "enemy side" were discounted and mocked as U.S. journalists puffed out their chests and waved the flag.

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