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Men’s Sex Problems are Growing — At Least on the Radio

Once upon a time, it was advertising about women’s flow that raised questions of taste on broadcast media. But lately its men’s intimate issues that have invaded radio in major metropolitan markets, leaving a lot of people saying, “I can’t believe I just heard that.”

Martha Rosenberg, AlterNet

Men: do you want to be bigger and thicker where it counts?

Would you like a longer, more powerful sexual experience?

And speaking of you know what, are you standing over the toilet waiting for your flow? Waking up in the middle of the night to urinate?

Once upon a time, it was advertising about women’s flow that raised questions of taste on broadcast media. But lately its men’s intimate issues that have invaded radio in major metropolitan markets, leaving a lot of people saying, “I can’t believe I just heard that.”

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Daniel Schorr, Journalist, Dies at 93

His aggressive reporting over 70 years as a respected broadcast and print journalist brought him into conflict with censors, the Nixon administration and network superiors.

Robert D. Hershey, Jr., New York Times | NY.

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Lydia Howell

Daniel Schorr, flanked by his lawyer, Joseph A. Califano Jr., and his wife, Lisbeth, before the House ethics committee in 1976. Bob Daugherty/Associated Press

Daniel Schorr, whose aggressive reporting over 70 years as a respected broadcast and print journalist brought him into conflict with censors, the Nixon administration and network superiors, died on Friday (July 23) in Washington, DC. He was 93.

His death was announced by NPR, where he had been a commentator for the last 25 years. A spokeswoman, Anna Christopher, said he died at a Washington, DC, hospital after a short illness. He lived in Washington.

Mr. Schorr, a protégé of Edward R. Murrow at CBS News, initially made his mark at CBS as a foreign correspondent, notably in the Soviet Union. He opened the network’s Moscow bureau in 1955 and persuaded the Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev to sit for his first television interview, with “Face the Nation.” At the end of 1957, Mr. Schorr went home for the holidays and was denied readmission to the Soviet Union after repeatedly defying Soviet censors.

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Staying Tuned: A Life in Journalism ~ Daniel Schorr, Described in Powell's Books

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Will Shapira

  • Synopses & Reviews
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