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Facing the Future as a Media Felon on the Gulf Coast

  • Gulf Coast now a BP police state as law enforcement conspires with BP to intimidate journalists
  • Media, boaters could face criminal penalties by entering oil cleanup 'safety zone'

Georgianne Nienaber, Reader Supported News

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Lydia Howell

God forbid you should see this.

The United States Coast Guard considers me a felon now, because I "willfully" want to obtain more photos like these to show you the utter devastation occurring in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, as a result of the BP oil catastrophe. If the Coast Guard has its way, all media, not just independent writers and photographers like myself and Jerry Moran, will be fined $40,000 and receive Class D felony convictions for providing the truth about oiled birds and dolphins, in addition to broken, filthy, unmanned boom material that is trapping oil in the marshlands and estuaries. We don't have $40,000 to spare, and have had to scrape the bottoms of our checkbooks as is to hire boats to take us to the devastation the Coast Guard, under the direction of BP, does not want you to see.

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Gulf Coast now a BP police state as law enforcement conspires with BP to intimidate journalists, Mike Adams, Natural News

  • This is scary stuff, folks. Now we have a police state in America. No one can deny it. You can't argue the point anymore. It is documented fact, and it's happening right now in the Gulf Coast.
  • First Amendment suspended in the Gulf of Mexico as spill cover-up goes Orwellian
  • White House Enacts Rules Inhibiting Media From Covering Oil Spill

Media, boaters could face criminal penalties by entering oil cleanup 'safety zone' Chris Kirkham, New Orleans Times-Picayune | LA


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What do we call them…you know, “the disabled”?

How many Psychiatrists does it take to change a lightbulb…or Journalist, or Reporter?

Pat Maher, SCILife, in nAblement

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Betty Culver

After years of being assaulted with scores of inappropriate references  in print, television, film and the internet to “the disabled”, I need to register my formal complaint to “the media.” Wake up and apply some accepted, common sense principles to the treatment of people with disabilities in your work!

How many Psychiatrists does it take to change a lightbulb…or Journalist, or Reporter?

The answer is just one - but the lightbulb, journalist, or reporter  must really want to change! I wish that I had catalogued every time in recent memory that I noted the inappropriate or awkward use of language  in a television, newspaper or internet story while referring to or interacting with a person who had a disability. Sadly I’ve become anesthetized to its presence. It’s like the soft rumbling of a building’s heating or air conditioning unit, or the regular and rhythmic grumble of the L through a closed window in Chicago’s Loop. Not true! It’s more like nails on a blackboard, the maddeningly high volume of commercials during television shows, the incessant pounding of jackhammer on concrete or the constant ringing of tinnitus in your eardrum.

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PBS's Shultz Doc Has Content to Match Its Conflicts

  • The documentary's most glaring omissions come in its discussion of Shultz's role in the Iran/Contra scandal, in which the Reagan administration tried to ransom U.S. hostages by selling arms to Iran, and surreptitiously continued efforts to overthrow the Nicaraguan government in defiance of congressional prohibitions.
  • PBS, George Shultz and Funny Funding

Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR)

After FAIR criticized PBS for airing Turmoil and Triumph, a documentary about Reagan-era Secretary of State George Shultz that was funded almost entirely by his friends and associates (Action Alert, 7/12/10; Activism Update, 7/20/10), the program’s producer/writer/director David deVries (PBS.org, 7/16/10) complained that FAIR (and Nation critic Greg Mitchell--7/12/10) hadn't "[paid] much attention to the content and quality of the production."

FAIR had not seen the program prior to its three-part airing on PBS; our initial criticism was based on the conflicts of interest in its funding, bolstered by other critics' description of its uncritical approach to its subject (New York Times, 7/12/10; Wall Street Journal, 7/9/10; San Francisco Chronicle, 7/10/10). Now that the program has aired, however, we can report that its content is as selective, deceptive and indeed inaccurate as you would expect to find in a vanity project of this sort.

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Related:

PBS, George Shultz and Funny Funding, Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR)

  • Do PBS’s conflict of interest rules apply?
  • What's PBS's excuse this time for airing a program whose subject is so closely tied to the interests of its funders?
  • Write to PBS ombud Michael Getler


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How You Will Change the World with Social Networking ~ Deanna Zandt

  • "Technology isn't a magic bullet for solving the world's problems, but it's certainly a spark to the fastest fuse to explode our notions of power that the world has seen in a thousand years. In this book, I hope to show you how to light that fuse."
  • An excerpt from Deanna Zandt's new book, 'Share This!' explains how we share information and find community will change our lives.

Berrett-Koehler Publishers, in AlterNet

Social networking is all the rage, and it's coming at us, a million miles an hour. We're surrounded by a flurry of new technology, and just when we begin to make sense of one tool, a new one arrives on the scene.

All this activity leaves us little time to contemplate any forest for all these trees, let alone think about the bigger picture of how this technology will change the future. But here's the secret: How we share information, find community, and both connect and disconnect will give us unprecedented influence over our place in the world. Social media technology holds some of the biggest potential for creating tectonic shifts in how we operate, and the overall open-ended promise of technology gives us a great shot at creating the systems for change. Technology isn't a magic bullet for solving the world's problems, but it's certainly a spark to the fastest fuse to explode our notions of power that the world has seen in a thousand years. In this book, I hope to show you how to light that fuse.

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Men’s Sex Problems are Growing — At Least on the Radio

Once upon a time, it was advertising about women’s flow that raised questions of taste on broadcast media. But lately its men’s intimate issues that have invaded radio in major metropolitan markets, leaving a lot of people saying, “I can’t believe I just heard that.”

Martha Rosenberg, AlterNet

Men: do you want to be bigger and thicker where it counts?

Would you like a longer, more powerful sexual experience?

And speaking of you know what, are you standing over the toilet waiting for your flow? Waking up in the middle of the night to urinate?

Once upon a time, it was advertising about women’s flow that raised questions of taste on broadcast media. But lately its men’s intimate issues that have invaded radio in major metropolitan markets, leaving a lot of people saying, “I can’t believe I just heard that.”

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