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Minneapolis and the siren song of economic impact

  • Perhaps, however, we should resist the "sweet enchantment" of those economic projections, take them with a pinch of salt or at least try to understand what they mean.
  • Here’s Minnesota’s game plan to land the Super Bowl — but is it worth it?
  • Here's How The NFL Makes A Killing Off Of Taxpayers

Marlys Harris, MinnPost

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NicolletMallGrovesRedesign640.jpg Rendering of the "Nicollet Groves" area of a Nicollet Mall redesign. James Corner Field Operations Team

03/25/14 | It barely matters what the idea is — a new transit line, a baseball field, a hospital, an apartment complex, a widened road or expanded sewer system. Many of us, like terrible 2-year-olds, react with a petulant "no."    

But that resistance is often overwhelmed by the sweet yoo-hoo of the economic-impact study. Generally, one comes with each new proposal for civic improvement. Almost invariably, it predicts that the new project, whatever it is, will produce goodies beyond compare — jobs in the hundreds or thousands, spending in the millions, higher real-estate values and plushy tax revenues. Impressed, we say, "OK, let's do it."

A Minnesota native, Marlys Harris has been an investigative reporter and editor with specialties in consumer protection and finance for Money Magazine and Consumer Reports. 

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Related:

Here’s Minnesota’s game plan to land the Super Bowl — but is it worth it?

Briana Bierschbach, MinnPost 

VikingsStadiumFireworks640.jpg The new stadium isn’t built yet, but the plan is to have it finished by 2016 and Super Bowl-ready two years later. / Minnesota Vikings

01/30/14 | There are a few key ingredients to winning a Super Bowl in your home state. First get a handful of prominent business leaders in the mix, followed by the ringing endorsement of local and statewide politicians. Then bring up the fancy restaurants, convention centers and hotel rooms and raise a few million dollars. Last but not least, throw in a new football stadium.  

That’s the blueprint Gov. Mark Dayton and an all-new Super Bowl committee are working from as they aim to bring the 2018 game to the Vikings stadium in Minneapolis. The new stadium isn’t built yet, but the plan is to have it finished by 2016 and Super Bowl-ready two years later. By that time, it will have been more than 25 years since the football spectacle was held in Minnesota.

Briana Bierschbach reports on public affairs, higher education, politics and other important topics and issues in the news. 

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Series | Super Bowl XLVIII Illustrated, Part Four: the concussion defense, Jason Novak and Mike Duncan, theguardian.com

  • The final installment in a four-part series
  • Series | Super Bowl XLVIII Illustrated, Part Three: the great pinkwash 
  • Series | Super Bowl XLVIII Illustrated, Part Two: the stadium swindle
  • Series | Super Bowl XLVIII Illustrated, Part One: the NFL gameplan
  • Here's How The NFL Makes A Killing Off Of Taxpayers