You are here

A new report rated countries on ‘sustainable development.’ The U.S. did horribly.

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Environment%20Banner.jpg

For Jeffrey Sachs, the Columbia University economist and U.N. adviser, the poor score of the United States underscores that, while we’ve done exceedingly well economically, we’ve neglected the social and the environmental dimensions of progress — issues ranging from equality to ecosystem preservation.

Chris Mooney, Washington (DC) Post

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/%2522%40%2522%20Logo.jpg To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest.

 

 



https://img.washingtonpost.com/wp-apps/imrs.php?src=https://img.washingtonpost.com/rf/image_960w/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2015/09/25/Local-Enterprise/Images/2015-09-25T151615Z_01_NYK202_RTRIDSP_3_UN-ASSEMBLY.jpg&w=1484 Pope Francis addresses attendees in the opening ceremony to commence a plenary meeting of the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 at the United Nations headquarters in Manhattan, New York September 25, 2015. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

July 21, 2016 | Last September, urged on by Pope Francis, the United Nations and its 193 member states embraced the most sweeping quest yet to, basically, save the world and everyone in it — dubbed the Sustainable Development Goals. It’s a global agenda to fix climate change, stop hunger, end poverty, extend health and access to jobs, and vastly more — all by 2030.

The goals comprise no less than 17 separate items and 169 “targets” within them. And this isn’t just an airy exercise — the targets are quite specific (“By 2030, progressively achieve and sustain income growth of the bottom 40 per cent of the population at a rate higher than the national average”). That means that at least in many cases, countries can actually be measured on how they’re faring in meeting these goals, based on a large range of sociological, economic and other indicators.

 

Chris Mooney writes about energy and the environment at The Washington Post. He previously worked at Mother Jones, where he wrote about science and the environment and hosted a weekly podcast. Chris spent a decade prior to that as a freelance writer, podcaster and speaker, with his work appearing in Wired, Harper’s, Slate, Legal Affairs, The Los Angeles Times, The Post and The Boston Globe, to name a few.

Full story … 

Related:

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Earth%20Floating%20on%20the%20Sea.jpg Global Warming Threatens the Material Basis of the Global Economy, Tim Radford, Climate News Network  / TruthDig