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Researchers Against the War Machine - The Story of NARMIC

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NARMIC wanted to research the power and money behind the defense industry and get this research into the hands of peace activists who were resisting the Vietnam War so they could fight more effectively. They wanted — as they put it — to “fill the gap” between “peace research” and “peace organizing.” They wanted to do research for action — hence, their use of the term “action/research” to describe what they did.

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Derek Seidman, Eyes on the Ties / Portside

October 24, 2017 | It was 1969, and the American War on Vietnam seemed unending. Mass outrage over the war had spilled into the nation’s streets and campuses — outrage over the rising heap of body bags returning home, over the never-ending spree of bombs that barrelled down from US planes onto rural villages, with the images of fleeing families, their skin seared by napalm, broadcast across the world.

Hundreds of thousands of people had begun to resist the war. The fall of 1969 saw the historic Moratorium protests, the largest protests in US history.

Derek Seidman is a researcher with Public Accountability Initiative and its flagship site LittleSis, based in Buffalo, New York.

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North Korea Still Struggles with America’s Lethal Legacy. Some Facts.

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  • Part 1: North Korea – As Trump Threatens, the Nation Still Struggles with America’s Lethal Legacy
    • “Throughout the world, on any given day, a man, woman or child is likely to be displaced, tortured, killed or ‘disappeared’ … More often than not, the United States shares the blame.” (Amnesty International, 1996.)
  • Part 2: North Korea: A Threat or A Victim? Some Facts.
    • Here is just a small taste of what North Korea’s southern neighbor, in cahoots with Godfather America, has planned.
  • Related: How America Spreads Global Chaos

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1: North Korea – As Trump Threatens, the Nation Still Struggles with America’s Lethal Legacy

https://www.globalresearch.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/kim-jong-un-400x225.jpg“Throughout the world, on any given day, a man, woman or child is likely to be displaced, tortured, killed or ‘disappeared’ … More often than not, the United States shares the blame.” (Amnesty International, 1996.)

Felicity Arbuthnot, Global Research 

October 18, 2017 | As the US threatens to decimate North Korea again – if not the entire planet, given Donald Trump’s chillingly casual approach to the use of nuclear weapons – an article (1) has revealed the criminal legacy remaining from America’s last attack, ending sixty four years ago, on a country smaller than Mississippi. (North Korea is a landmass of 120,540 square kilometers, Mississippi is 125,443 square kilometers.)

“Experts say it will take a hundred years to clean up all of the unexploded ordnance”, says Major Jong Il Hyon: “but I think it will take much longer.”

Felicity Arbuthnot is a London-based freelance print and broadcast journalist who has visited Iraq many times in recent years to investigate the impact of sanctions. She was Iraq researcher for John Pilger s award winning film: "Paying the Price Killing the Children of Iraq".

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Part 2: North Korea: A Threat or A Victim? Some Facts.

https://www.globalresearch.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/jim-mattis-2017-02-15-300x168.jpgIf anyone is still wondering why North Korea was being “provocative” in missile tests and repeatedly declaring what would seem to be a daunting arsenal (although there is still no irrefutable, concrete proof of deliverable, long range nuclear weapons capability) here is just a small taste of what it’s southern neighbor, in cahoots with Godfather America, has planned (1).

Felicity Arbuthnot, Global Research

October 29, 2017 | “Decapitation.”

‘Kill the King and the regime will collapse. That is the rationale offered by South Korean military planners for a “decapitation unit” they are forming for the sole purpose of assassinating North Korea’s Supreme Leader, Kim Jong-un. They are convinced that, in the ensuing chaos, North Korea’s leadership would disintegrate and abandon the nuclear programme on which he has staked his prestige.

“Decapitation means we have only one target,” said Choi Jin-wook, a long-time North Korea analyst at the government’s Korea Institute for National Unification. “It’s much simpler to eliminate the leader than attack military bases.”

Felicity Arbuthnot is a London-based freelance print and broadcast journalist who has visited Iraq many times in recent years to investigate the impact of sanctions. She was Iraq researcher for John Pilger s award winning film: "Paying the Price Killing the Children of Iraq".

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Related:

How America Spreads Global Chaos, Nicolas J. S. Davies, Antiwar.com


Americans had better hope that we are not so exceptional, and that the world will find a diplomatic rather than a military “solution” to its American problem. Our chances of survival would improve a great deal if American officials and politicians would finally start to act like something other than putty in the hands of the CIA.


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How We Learned Not To Care About America's Wars and the Trillion-Dollar National Security Budget

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  • Part 1: Tomgram: Andrew Bacevich, How We Learned Not To Care About America's Wars
    • A collective indifference to war has become an emblem of contemporary America.
  • Part 2: The Trillion-Dollar National Security Budget
    • So the next time you hear the president, the secretary of defense, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, or a hawkish lawmaker claim that the U.S. military is practically collapsing from a lack of funding, don’t believe it for a second. 

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1: Tomgram: Andrew Bacevich, How We Learned Not To Care About America's Wars

A collective indifference to war has become an emblem of contemporary America.  But don't expect your neighbors down the street or the editors of the New York Times to lose any sleep over that fact.  Even to notice it would require them -- and us -- to care.

Andrew Bacevich, TomDispatch

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Andrew%20J.%20Bacevich%20%7C%20America%27s%20War%20for%20the%20Greater%20Middle%20East%20jacket%20illus.jpgOctober 8, 2017 | Consider, if you will, these two indisputable facts.  First, the United States is today more or less permanently engaged in hostilities in not one faraway place, but at least seven.  Second, the vast majority of the American people could not care less. 

Nor can it be said that we don’t care because we don’t know.  True, government authorities withhold certain aspects of ongoing military operations or release only details that they find convenient.  Yet information describing what U.S. forces are doing (and where) is readily available, even if buried in recent months by barrages of presidential tweets.  Here, for anyone interested, are press releases issued by United States Central Command for just one recent week

Andrew Bacevich, a TomDispatch regular, is the author, most recently, of America’s War for the Greater Middle East: A Military History.

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Part 2: The Trillion-Dollar National Security Budget

So the next time you hear the president, the secretary of defense, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, or a hawkish lawmaker claim that the U.S. military is practically collapsing from a lack of funding, don’t believe it for a second. 

William Hartung, TomDispatch

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/William%20Hartung%20%7C%20Prophets%20of%20War%20cover%20illus.jpgJuly 25, 2017 | In May 2012, TomDispatch featured a piece by Chris Hellman and Mattea Kramer, both then analysts at the National Priorities Project, headlined “War Pay: The Nearly $1 Trillion National Security Budget.” The two of them ran through the figures for the cumulative annual budget for what we still mysteriously call “national security.”  In other words, they looked beyond the monumental Pentagon budget and found that the total for all such funding was at the time closing in on a trillion dollars a year. ($931 billion, to be exact.)

Strangely, though, in mainstream reportage while you’ll see discussion of what Congress is likely to pony up in any given year for the Pentagon and some associated activities, I doubt you’ll ever find a figure for total national security expenditures.  In fact, I’m ready to make a modest bet that, outside of the technical literature, in the five years since the Hellman-Kramer article, you would have a tough time finding such a cumulative number in the mainstream world for what we (that is, “we the people”) actually spend to support an ever more powerful national security state.  Meanwhile, that state within a state continues its relentless post-9/11 expansion, as it officially girds itself for the eternal fight against a single threat to American “safety,” one that holds only the most modest of actual dangers for Americans: terrorism.

William Hartung, a TomDispatch regular, is the director of the Arms and Security Project at the Center for International Policy.  His most recent book is Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex.

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Special Report | Ignoring What We Still Haven't Learned from the Vietnam War

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US Troops in Firefight in Viet Nam

  • Part 1: What We Still Haven't Learned from the Vietnam War
  • What happened to the citizens, community leaders, institutions, and politicians that we would allow this endless warfare to continue?
  • Part 2: Ken Burns’ powerful anti-war film on Vietnam ignores the power of the anti-war movement
  • The Vietnam peace movement provides an inspiring example of the power of ordinary citizens willing to stand up to the world’s most powerful government in a time of war. Its story deserves to be told fairly and fully.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 



Part 1: What We Still Haven't Learned from the Vietnam War

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Pentagon%20Protest%20Oct%2021%2C%2067.jpgPentagon Protest Oct 21, 67 Vietnam War protesters march at the Pentagon in Washington, DC on October 21, 1967. Photo credit: Frank Wolfe / LBJ Library / Wikimedia

What happened to the citizens, community leaders, institutions, and politicians that we would allow this endless warfare to continue? And where is the anti-war movement? Why are they MIA?

Jimmy Falls, WhoWhatWhy

October 21, 2017 | Fifty years ago today, in 1967, nearly 100,000 Americans marched on Washington, DC, to protest the Vietnam War. In those days there was a mandatory draft in place, and the risk was very real that a young man just out of high school could quickly wind up 13,000 miles away, fighting an unseen enemy in jungles that didn’t need tanks or B-52 bombers to inflict fear. Worse yet was the possibility of going MIA or coming home in a body bag — just another expendable statistic in the great fight against communism. But even many of those who made it back left part of their souls in that war zone.

Today there is no longer a mandatory draft. And neither is there any anti-war movement to speak of.

Jimmy Falls: Author at WhoWhatWhy.

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Part 2: Ken Burns’ powerful anti-war film on Vietnam ignores the power of the anti-war movement

 

The Vietnam peace movement provides an inspiring example of the power of ordinary citizens willing to stand up to the world’s most powerful government in a time of war. Its story deserves to be told fairly and fully.

Robert Levering, Waging Non-violence

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Vietnam%20Ant-War%20Protest.jpgOctober 17, 2017 | Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s PBS series, “The Vietnam War,” deserves an Oscar for its depiction of the gore of war and the criminality of the warmakers. But it also deserves to be critiqued for its portrayal of the anti-war movement.

Millions of us joined the struggle against the war. I worked for years as an organizer for major national demonstrations and many smaller ones. Any semblance between the peace movement I experienced and the one depicted by the Burns/Novick series is purely coincidental.

Robert Levering worked as full-time anti-Vietnam war organizer with such groups as AFSC and the New Mobilization Committee and Peoples Coalition for Peace and Justice. He is currently working on a book entitled "Resistance and the Vietnam War: The Nonviolent Movement that Crippled the Draft, Thwarted the War Effort While Helping Topple Two Presidents" to be published in 2018. He is also working with a team of fellow draft resisters on a documentary to be released in 2018 entitled "The Boys Who Said NO! Draft Resistance and the Vietnam War."

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