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To Do Nothing Is A Decision As Well

Related: 1,000 mass shootings in 1,260 days: this is what America's gun crisis looks like

Center for American Progress

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/American%20Culture%20of%20Violence_1.jpg Jun 15, 2016 | This morning, three days after the tragedy in Orlando, Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) began a speaking filibuster on the Senate floor to honor the victims of Orlando and demand that the Senate take action to address gun violence. “I’m prepared to stand on this floor, and talk about the need for this body to come together on keeping terrorists away from getting guns … for frankly, as long as I can, because I know that we can come together on this issue,” he said. More than six hours later he remains on the floor, where he has been joined by many of his Senate Democratic colleagues.

 

One of the changes Sen. Murphy, along with many of his fellow Democratic Senators, is calling for is closing the terror gap, which is a loophole in our gun laws that allows suspected terrorists to legally purchase firearms. Right now in the United States, if you are considered too dangerous to buy a plane ticket, you can still buy a firearm. Suspected terrorists who are placed on a no-fly list are prevented from flying on an airplane but can still legally purchase guns. And they have.

Center for American Progress: A think tank offering policy proposals, talking points, events, news and columns.

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Related:

1,000 mass shootings in 1,260 days: this is what America's gun crisis looks like, Guardian US interactive team, The Guardian

The shooting in San Bernardino with 14 victims has added to the growing number over the past three decades, but support for gun control has fallen.

Related: From the Archives | Our gun myths are all wrong: The real history behind the Second Amendment clichés that have sustained our lethal gun culture

 

1,000 mass shootings in 1,260 days: this is what America's gun crisis looks like

  • The shooting in San Bernardino with 14 victims has added to the growing number over the past three decades, but support for gun control has fallen.
  • Related: From the Archives | Our gun myths are all wrong: The real history behind the Second Amendment clichés that have sustained our lethal gun culture

Guardian US interactive team, The Guardian

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Tuesday 14 June 2016 | Sunday’s attack on the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida was the deadliest mass shooting in American history – but there were five other mass shootings in the US during that weekend alone.

“We have a pattern now of mass shootings in this country that has no parallel anywhere else in the world,” Barack Obama said after the San Bernardino attack in December 2015.

Data compiled by the Gun Violence Archive via the crowd-sourced website ShootingTracker.com reveals a shocking human toll: there is a mass shooting – defined as four or more people shot in one incident, not including the shooter – on five out of every six days, on average. (Updated on 13 June 2016)

US mass shootings becoming more frequent – and more deadly

Guardian US interactive team in New York is a small group of designers, interactive developers and journalists working alongside editorial teams to produce dynamic projects.

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Related:

From the Archives | Our gun myths are all wrong: The real history behind the Second Amendment clichés that have sustained our lethal gun culture, Pamela Haag, Salon

America was born with a unique bond to gun culture, some would have you believe. They're peddling bad history.

 

They Were Soldiers | How the Wounded Return from America's Wars: The Untold Story

Despite all the talk in this country about our “wounded warriors,” no other book gives us a more powerful sense of the genuine cost of war to Americans.

Ann Jones, Tom Dispatch

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http://www.tomdispatch.com/images/managed/jonessoldiers_1430707364_160.jpg May 3, 2015.| At 73, having spent years focusing on the civilian toll from Washington’s Afghan War, Ann Jones embedded on an American forward operating base to experience what that war was like for the U.S. troops in the field. The next year, she began following grievously wounded American soldiers from the moment they came off the battlefield all the way back home.  Her journey proved to be nothing short of an odyssey. Despite all the talk in this country about our “wounded warriors,” no other book gives us a more powerful sense of the genuine cost of war to Americans.

Ann Jones is the author of “They Were Soldiers: How the Wounded Return from America’s Wars—the Untold Story.”

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Related:

From the Archives | Disabled Veterans Shatter the Myths of American Warfare, Ann Jones, The Intercept

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Veterans%27%20concerns%20%26%20stories.jpgPhoto Credit: Robert Adrian Hillman/Shutterstock.com

Friday, May 15, 2015 | It is the business of soldiers to be killed, and the job of civilians to be grateful for their human sacrifice, because that’s the way God wants it, or so we have been told by famous generals, patriotic politicians, war profiteers and public relations firms under contract to the Pentagon.

But American­ wars have produced masses of other, far more troublesome soldiers who instead came home with crippling physical and mental wounds. They are the subject of Paying With Their Bodies: American War and the Problem of the Disabled Veteran, a valuable history by John M. Kinder. His concern is not the multiple problems of individual disabled vets, but the capitalized Problem they collectively present to U.S. policymakers.

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