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MLK Day 2017: Mobilizing Against Racism, Capitalism and Militarism in a Neo-Fascist Era

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Dawn at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington, DC, on January 18, 2016. (Photo: Zach Gibson / New York Times)

MLK Day has since become a day centered around a watered-down or "sanitized" telling of the life of King and the movement he was a part of. Today, many young people will be taught a warped version of history -- punctuated by King's inspiring speeches -- that overlooks the hard work of organizers. With a neo-fascist president-elect taking office in just four days, these ahistorical narratives are dangerous. 

Asha Rosa Ransby-Sporn, Truthout

Monday, January 16, 2017 | Coretta Scott King testified before Congress twice, in 1979 and 1982, to argue for the importance of instituting a national holiday in honor of her late husband, Martin Luther King Jr.

Pushback to the proposed holiday included conservative Democrat Congressman Larry McDonald's assertion that a recognized holiday centered around King -- a figure who both engaged in civil disobedience and openly criticized the government -- would encourage young people to foster "contempt for the law."

Asha Rosa Ransby-Sporn is a Black, queer writer and organizer currently serving as a national organizing co-chair for Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100). She was part of the We Charge Genocide youth delegation to the United Nations in 2014 where she testified on police violence in Chicago. Asha is committed to movements that embrace the transformative potential of a radical/Black/queer imagination towards the abolition of police and prisons.

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Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr.: The Three Evils of Society: Racism, Militarism and Capitalismdandelionsalad

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“What they truly advocate is Socialism for the rich and Capitalism for the poor.” — Martin Luther King, Jr., Address Delivered at the National Conference on New Politics, August 31, 1967

 

 

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Restoring the Promise of Public Education

  • In 1970, Dr. Virgil Belue made a decision that would lead to true racial integration in both the schools and the community of one Deep South city. Today, with schools across the country as segregated as they were half a century ago, his success has something to teach us all.
  • The Case of Clinton, Mississippi

Danielle Elliot, the Atlantic

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https://cdn.theatlantic.com/assets/media/files/lovett-ext.jpg  Until 1980, Lovett School was a K-8 school serving the predominantly black neighborhoods in Clinton and the surrounding rural area. When it became part of the Clinton school system, it became the sixth-grade school for all students in Clinton.  

January, 2017 | July 28, 1970, is a date that Virgil Belue will never forget. That morning he defended his doctoral dissertation, and that afternoon he started the job that would become his legacy to generations of students and to his native state of Mississippi.

On that day, Belue became the first superintendent of the schools in Clinton, Mississippi, a district that did not exist until a few weeks before. In 1954, with the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court had declared the segregation of schools in the South to be unconstitutional. Sixteen years later, Mississippi was still in court, and it remains so today, with 44 desegregation cases still active. The fact that no one is suing Clinton can be traced to decisions that Belue began making that summer day 46 years ago, sitting alone in a nurse’s office in a district that had as yet no office for him, no budget, no school buses, no maintenance equipment, and just four weeks before students would report to school.

Danielle Elliot is a writer and multimedia producer based in New York.

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Coretta Scott King’s Scathing Takedown Of Jeff Sessions Is A Must-Read

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  • She fought for the Voting Rights Act, while Sessions called it “intrusive.”
  • You can read her full testimony here.

Alana Horowitz Satlin, the Huffington Post

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In earnest,

Dave & the Crew



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01/11/2017 | Author Coretta Scott King, the widow of Martin Luther King Jr., wrote a scathing testimony against Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) when he was being considered for federal judgeship in 1986. In a letter sent to then-Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.), King wrote that Sessions “lacks the temperament, fairness, and judgement to be a federal judge” and said that his appointment “would irreparably damage the work of my husband.”

 

The letter was first cited by BuzzFeed on Tuesday and The Washington Post later published it in full.

Author Coretta Scott King is the widow of Martin Luther King Jr.

Alana Horowitz Satlin, Assignment Editor, the Huffington Post.

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Series | Zinn Education Project - Dec. 29, 1890, Anniversary of the Wounded Knee Massacre

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  • Part 1: Dec. 29, 1890: Anniversary of the Wounded Knee Massacre
  • Here are resources on Native American history and contemporary issues for teaching (and learning!) outside the textbook.
  • Part 2: December 29, 1890 - Wounded Knee Massacre
  • The 7th Cavalry (Custer's old command) fired their artillery amidst mostly unarmed women, children, and fleeing men.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1: Dec. 29, 1890: Anniversary of the Wounded Knee Massacre

Here are resources on Native American history and contemporary issues for teaching (and learning!) outside the textbook.

The Zinn Education Project

https://zinnedproject-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/wounded_knee_artwork-213x300.jpg Poster: We Remember Wounded Knee

On Dec. 29, 1890, a Lakota encampment on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation was attacked by the U.S. Army and close to 300 Native Americans were murdered near Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota. 

Read more about the massacre at the Last of the Independents website.

Beginning on Feb. 27, 1973, 83 years later, Wounded Knee was the site of a 71-day standoff between the American Indian Movement and federal law enforcement officials. Watch Episode 5 from the film We Shall Remain on Wounded Knee history.

Here are resources on Native American history and contemporary issues for teaching (and learning!) outside the textbook.

The Zinn Education Project promotes and supports the teaching of people’s history in middle and high school classrooms across the country. Based on the lens of history highlighted in Howard Zinn’s best-selling book A People’s History of the United States, the website offers free, downloadable lessons and articles organized by theme, time period, and reading level.

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Part 2: December 29, 1890 - Wounded Knee Massacre

The 7th Cavalry (Custer's old command) fired their artillery amidst mostly unarmed women, children, and fleeing men.

Carl Bunin, Today in Peace and Justice History 

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December 29, 1890 | The U.S. Army killed approximately 300 Oglala Sioux at Wounded Knee, in the new state of South Dakota. 

The 7th Cavalry (Custer's old command) fired their artillery amidst mostly unarmed women, children, and fleeing men. 

Carl Bunin: Publisher, Today in Peace and Justice History, a weekly peace and justice history mailing.

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Brothers in White Resentment

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  • What gave us Donald Trump is what gave us Dylann Roof.
  • Related: Racism With No Racists: The President Trump Conundrum

Jamelle Bouie, Slate

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http://www.slate.com/content/dam/slate/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2016/12/161215_POL_Trump-Roof.jpg.CROP.promo-xlarge2.jpg Donald Trump did not cause Dylann Roof. But there are clear thematic connections between the two. Photo illustration by Slate. Photos by Drew Angerer/Getty Images, Grace Beahm-Pool/Getty Images.

On June 16, 2015, Donald Trump took the stage at his eponymous tower in New York City and announced his bid for the White House. His message was clear. “The U.S. has become a dumping ground for everyone else's problems,” Trump said.

A day later, in South Carolina, 21-year-old Dylann Roof walked into Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, where members were holding Bible study. Using a .45-caliber Glock handgun and eight magazines of ammunition, Roof shot and killed nine people, including the pastor, the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, who was also a state senator. Before he arrived at the church, Roof posted a manifesto on his website, a racist tirade that expressed his motives. His message was also clear. “Integration has done nothing but bring Whites down to level of brute animals,” wrote Roof.

Jamelle Bouie is Slate’s chief political correspondent.

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Related: 

Racism With No Racists: The President Trump Conundrum, Tressie McMillan Cottom, tressiemc <>

  • If the media cannot call that racism, will they be able to cover President-elect Donald Trump?
  • And while they figure it out, how bad will the lives of racial people get while racism hides behind euphemisms?
  • Related: Another Election Loser: Corporate Media

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