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Race & Ethnicity

Race & Ethnicity

163 Years Ago, A Former Slave Rocked The World With These Words

  • Actress Alfre Woodard performs a very moving piece from abolitionist, women's rights proponent, and former slave Sojourner Truth that was originally delivered in 1851. Yep, before the Civil War, before the right to vote for anybody but white men ... That 1851.
  • Sojourner Truth (1797-1883): Ain't I A Woman? Delivered 1851, Women's Convention, Akron, Ohio

Brandon Weber, Upworthy

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BlackHistoryMonth.jpg Well, children, where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter. I think that 'twixt the negroes of the South and the women at the North, all talking about rights, the white men will be in a fix pretty soon. But what's all this here talking about?

That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain't I a woman? Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain't I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man - when I could get it - and bear the lash as well! And ain't I a woman? I have borne thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a woman?

Brandon Weber:  I'm a labor union addict, educator, change catalyst, and a dreamer. I strongly believe in the power of working people, and I'm convinced that social media will be one of the key ways they kick some ass.

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Marijuana Prohibition Was Racist From The Start.

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  • The fact of the matter is that the federal ban on marijuana has discouraged the type and volume of research that will likely need to be done before any absolute conclusions can be made about weed. Until then, very little is certain -- except for the racial undertones of the war on pot.
  • Not Much Has Changed.
  • Don't Believe The (Marijuana) Hype

Nick WingHuffington Post

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Reefer Madness Is ContagiousReefer madness is contagious. Photo via 

01/14/2014 |As the nation's nearly 80-year history of pot prohibition slowly begins to crumble, starting with Colorado's recent implementation of taxed and legalized recreational marijuana, critics of the increasingly popular policy shift are jumping to denounce the move. A number of white pundits and newspaper columnists have been among the most vocal, claiming that marijuana must remain illegal, despite their own prior use of it, because it supposedly makes people dumber.

The columns themselves served as the most persuasive evidence of that point. And while such a correlation between pot use and intelligence has yet to be proven, one must be willing to ignore the racist roots of marijuana prohibition and the manner in which this unjust system of anti-drug enforcement still plays out today to make such a shallow argument in the first place.

Nick Wing is the Senior Viral Editor at the Huffington Post, Washington D.C. Metro Area

 

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Related:

Don't Believe The (Marijuana) Hype, Maia Szalavitz, The Fix

What most people think they know about marijuana—especially media columnists—is just years of unscientific, paranoid, and even racist government propaganda.01/13/14 | Everyone thinks they know something about drugs—whether from personal experience or from 8th grade prevention classes or simply because the media presents so many stories about them. Unfortunately, most of what people think they know is inaccurate, and comes from years of government war-on-drugs propaganda, with little understanding of its medical and historical context.

Nativity, the Story of Whistle-blower Kevin Annett and the “little matter of genocide”

  • The dirty secret, the “little matter of genocide”, about which the United States of America shares considerable guilt, is the century-long history of abuse, rape and murder of tens of thousands of its aboriginal children in church-run Indian residential schools and mission schools, a subject on which Kevin is an acknowledged world expert.
  • Ebony and Ivy: The Secret History of How Slavery Helped Build America's Elite Colleges

Gary G. Kohls, Duty to Warn

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Kevin%20Annett.com%20Logo.jpg December 17, 2013 | One of the most meaningful Christmas stories that I have ever heard came from my Vancouver, Canada friend, Reverend Kevin Annett. His story is titled “Nativity” and is printed further below.

Kevin spent a week at my home in Duluth, Minnesota a couple of years ago. The week was spent giving scheduled radio and film interviews, giving informal talks over meals, delivering a major speech to the Lake Superior Freethinkers, conducting forums at churches and answering questions following a Zinema 2 screening of his award-winning documentary, “Unrepenant”. It was a productive week, although local media chose not to cover any of his appearances.

story/45/24045/w320/EbonyIvy1.jpg.png?20131120 Dr. Gary G. Kohls is a retired physician who writes about issues of war, peace, justice, mental health and nonviolence and feels it is important to mix religion and non-partisan politics. 

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Related:

Ebony and Ivy: The Secret History of How Slavery Helped Build America's Elite Colleges, Amy Goodman, Democracy Now!

  • You know, you can find a version of that story for every college that’s established in the colonial world. You’re playing basically two degrees of separation from some horrific slaving voyage.
  • Filmmaker Uncovers Her Family’s Shocking Slave-Trading History, Urges
  • Americans to Explore Own Roots
  • The Best and the Brightest Led America Off a Cliff

Greg Palast | The Mandela Barbie

  • The ruling class creates commemorative dolls and statues of revolutionary leaders as a way to tell us their cause is won, so go home.
  • The Mandela Barbie is dressed to serve a new version of racism, Apartheid 2.0, worsening both in South Africa - and in the USA.
  • The life and legacy of Nelson Mandela

Greg Palast, Truthout

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MandelaMandela in his Mandela & Tambo law office. (Photo: JurgenSchadeberg / Mandiba A to Z: the Many Faces of Nelson Mandela)

 

Friday, 13 December 2013 | I can't take it anymore. All week, I've watched Nelson Mandela reduced to a Barbie doll. From Fox News to the Bush family, the politicians and media mavens who body-blocked the anti-Apartheid Movement and were happy to keep Mandela behind bars, now get to dress his image up in any silly outfit they choose.

 

Poor Mandela. When he's not a doll, he's a statue. He joins Martin Luther King as another bronzed monument whose use is to tell us that apartheid is now "defeated" - to quote the ridiculous headline in the Times.

 

Greg Palast: Forensic economist, author of the New York Times best-seller Billionaires & Ballot Bandits, is a Puffin Foundation Fellow for Investigative Reporting. His film of investigative reports for BBC-TV, Vultures & Vote Rustlers, was released this week on DVD.

 

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Related:

 

Palast Vultures and Vote RustlersThe life and legacy of Nelson Mandela, People's World

  • Nelson Mandela's recent passing was greeted with near universal respect and admiration around the globe. Why?
  • What makes Mandela special?
  • What did Mandela achieve in his life? What is the legacy of Mandela' life and struggles for South Africa and the world?
  • Why is Mandela so revered and admired from the halls of power to the smallest villages and poorest ghettos?
  • Join peoplesworld.org for a teleconference discussion of these questions and more:
  • The Life & Legacy of Nelson Mandela

Tuesday, December 17
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