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Race & Ethnicity

Race & Ethnicity

The Problem of Race in America: September 3, 2014

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  • We should honor the sacrifices of the heroes of the civil rights movement, the courageous men and women who risked their freedom and even lives in the battle against racial discrimination. 
  • Their vision for a society of genuine social progress and economic opportunity can be achieved only if we recognize the inherent worth of the individual and we follow in their footsteps to enshrine the principle of individual rights. 
  • Part 1: He Dropped One Letter In His Name While Applying For Jobs, And The Responses Rolled In
  • Part 2: This Is What It's Like To Be An Unarmed Black Man In America

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

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Part 1: He Dropped One Letter In His Name While Applying For Jobs, And The Responses Rolled In

Although digital job applications would seem to be the ultimate exercise in colorblind hiring, numerous studies and applicants have found the opposite

Cate Matthews, Huffington Post 

08/ferguson5.jpg09/02/2014 | His name is José Zamora, and he had a routine.

During his months-long job search, he says he logged onto his computer every morning and combed the internet for listings, applying to everything he felt qualified for. In the Buzzfeed video here, he estimates that he sent out between 50 to 100 resumes a day -- which is, in a word, impressive.

But Zamora said he wasn't getting any responses, so on a hunch, he decided to drop the "s" in his name. José Zamora became Joe Zamora, and a week later, he says his inbox was full.

Cate Matthews is the Associate Editor, Digital Innovations at the Huffington Post

Full story … 



Part 2: This Is What It's Like To Be An Unarmed Black Man In America

The video comes in the midst of a nationwide conversation about the "criminalization of the black body," a phenomenon in which the act of walking while black -- or, as is the case in this clip, sitting on your porch eating ice cream while black -- is met with violence and bullets. It's as absurd of a reality as it is a damning one.

Cate MatthewsHuffington Post 

09/02/2014 | You know how it is. You're outside your house, sitting on your stoop, peaceably eating an ice cream cone, and when you look up there's a gun trained on your face and a police officer demanding that you vacate the premises.

Or maybe you don't. You don't, unless you're not white.

In "Cop v. Black Guy," a Funny Or Die video written by "Key And Peele" veterans Colton Dunn and Phil Augusta Jackson, a cop accosts a young man sitting on his on porch. Things advance and get absurd quickly -- his uniform switches from SWAT to Stormtrooper before we know it -- and the absurdity is fitting.

Cate Matthews is the Associate Editor, Digital Innovations at the Huffington Post

Full story … 

Video reveals police’s stunning double-standard for black Americans

  • In a shocking video posted to YouTube, St. Paul (MN) police tase and arrest a black man picking his kids up from preschool. 
  • “I’m not your brother!”
  • Justice Ginsburg: America Has A ‘Real Racial Problem’ 

Joanna Rothkopf, Salon

Screen-Shot-2014-08-29-at-8.57.28-AM.pngVideo of the confrontation (Credit: YouTube)

Friday, Aug 29, 2014 | The latest in police misconduct was captured in a cellphone video that surfaced earlier this week. The video depicts a black man, identified as 28-year-old Christopher Lollie, sitting in a public space waiting to pick up his young children from New Horizon Academy in downtown St. Paul, Minnesota.

“I want to know who you are and what the problem was back there,” a female cop says to Lollie at the start of the video.

Joanna Rothkopf is an assistant editor at Salon, focusing on sustainability.

Full story …

Related:

Justice Ginsburg: America Has A ‘Real Racial Problem’ Ian Millhiser, Think Progress

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  • The Court’s present majority seems much more interested in using its power to thwart racial justice.
  • What White People Can Do About the Killing of Black Men in America

 

Justice Ginsburg: America Has A ‘Real Racial Problem’

Rights%20%26%20Liberties%20Banner.jpg

  • The Court’s present majority seems much more interested in using its power to thwart racial justice.
  • What White People Can Do About the Killing of Black Men in America

Ian Millhiser, Think Progress

I%20Want%20You%20with%2010%20yr%20banner.jpgIf you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

o-RUTH-BADER-GINSBURG-RETIREMENT-facebook-e1387385427784.jpgCredit: (AP Photo/Jessica Hill) 

August 22, 2014 | The Supreme Court was “once a leader in the world” in combating racial discrimination, according to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. “What’s amazing,” she added, “is how things have changed.”

Ginsburg, who was one of America’s top civil rights attorneys before President Carter appointed her to the federal bench in 1980, spoke at length with the National Law Journal‘s Marcia Coyle in an interview that was published Friday. In that interview, she lays out just how much the Court’s outlook on race has changed since she was arguing women’s equality cases before it in the 1970s.

Ian Millhiser is a Senior Constitutional Policy Analyst at the Center for American Progress Action Fund and the Editor of ThinkProgress Justice. 

Full story … 

Related:

What White People Can Do About the Killing of Black Men in AmericaPaul Brandeis Raushenbush, Huffington Post

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White people need to get off the computer and get involved with our voices, feet, votes and resources to help make sure that this epidemic of black deaths in America ends. This is not a 'black problem it is an American problem and it will take all of us working together to solve it.

Here's What Happens to Police Officers Who Shoot Unarmed Black Men

  • History appears to be in Officer Darren Wilson's favor.
  • When law enforcement is law and order’s biggest threat

Jaeah Lee and Katie Rose Quandt, Mother Jones

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ferguson5.jpg A man watches as police walk through a cloud of smoke during a clash with protesters, Aug. 13, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. (Credit: AP/Jeff Roberson).

August 22, 2014  |  In the week since 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, initial autopsy findings, police reports, and eyewitness accounts have begun to provide some insights into the circumstances of his death. But plenty of questions remain unanswered, not the least of them: Where is Officer Darren Wilson, and what's likely to happen to him? Wilson, who was put on administrative leave after killing Brown,  reportedly lefthome with his family a few days before his name was made public. A  fundraising campaign launched on August 17 has already raised more than $10,000 to cover the financial needs of Wilson's family, "including legal fees." (The campaign has since increased its goal to $100,000.)

It remains to be seen whether Wilson will face criminal charges, but a limited review of similar killings by police suggests that the officers more often than not walk away without an indictment, and are very rarely convicted. Delores Jones-Brown, a law professor and director of the Center on Race, Crime, and Justice at John Jay College of Criminal Justice,  looked at 21 publicized cases from 1994 through 2009 in which a police officer killed an unarmed black person. Of those, only seven cases resulted in an indictment—for criminally negligent homicide, obstruction of justice, conspiracy, or violation of civil rights—and only three officers were found guilty.

Jaeah Lee is the associate interactive producer at Mother Jones. 

Katie Rose Quandt is a senior online editorial fellow at Mother Jones.

Full story … 

Related:

When law enforcement is law and order’s biggest threat, Simon Maloy, Salon

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  • The debacle in Ferguson represents a near-total breakdown of our civic institutions. Here's why that's so scary
  • All hell has broken loose. 
  • Cops Behaving Badly, June 28,2014

 

 

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