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Race & Ethnicity

Race & Ethnicity

String of Nighttime Fires Hit Predominately Black Churches in Four Southern States

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  • In what may not be a coincidence, a string of nighttime fires have damaged or destroyed at least six predominately black churches in four southern states in the past week.
  • Black America is getting screwed.

Bill Morlin, Southern Poverty Law Center

1*eHaipQNA_ctiEIiGI4LxmQ.jpegFire at Briar Creek Street Baptist Church

June 26, 2015 | In what may not be a coincidence, a string of nighttime fires have damaged or destroyed at least six predominately black churches in four southern states in the past week.

Arsonists started at least three of the fires, while other causes are being examined in the other fires, investigators say.

The series of fires — some of them suspicious and possible hate crimes — came in the week following a murderous rampage by a white supremacist who shot and killed nine people at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C.

Bill Morlin: Correspondent, Southern Poverty Law Center

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Black America is getting screwed, David Dayen, Salon 

  • Shocking new study highlights the depths of economic disparities
  • Black retail workers are twice as likely to live below the poverty line, and twice as likely to be unemployed. Why?
  • 40 Reasons US Jails And Prisons Are Full Of Black And Poor People

Series | Considering the Problem of Race in America, Part 8: Peter Singer: On Racism, Animal Rights and Human Rights

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This is the eighth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Peter Singer, a professor of bioethics at Princeton University. He is the author of numerous books, including, most recently, “The Most Good You Can Do.” — George Yancy

George Yancy and Peter Singer, The Stone / New York Times

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May 27, 2015   | George Yancy: You have popularized the concept of speciesism, which, I believe was first used by the animal activist Richard Ryder. Briefly, define that term and how do you see it as similar to or different from racism?

Peter Singer: Speciesism is an attitude of bias against a being because of the species to which it belongs. Typically, humans show speciesism when they give less weight to the interests of nonhuman animals than they give to the similar interests of human beings. Note the requirement that the interests in question be “similar.” It’s not speciesism to say that normal humans have an interest in continuing to live that is different from the interests that nonhuman animals have. One might, for instance, argue that a being with the ability to think of itself as existing over time, and therefore to plan its life, and to work for future achievements, has a greater interest in continuing to live than a being who lacks such capacities.

The Stone is a forum for contemporary philosophers and other thinkers on issues both timely and timeless.

George Yancy is a professor of philosophy at Duquesne University. He has written, edited and co-edited numerous books, including “Black Bodies, White Gazes,” “Look, a White!” and “Pursuing Trayvon Martin,” co-edited with Janine Jones.

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Part 7: How Liberalism and Racism Are Wed

This is the seventh in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Falguni A. Sheth, an associate professor of philosophy and political theory at Hampshire College. She is the author of “Toward a Political Philosophy of Race.”

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Part 6: Philosophy’s Lost Body and Soul

This is the sixth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Linda Martín Alcoff, a professor of philosophy at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center. She was the president of the American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division, for 2012-13. She is the author of “Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self.” 

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Part 5: What’s Wrong With ‘All Lives Matter’?

This is the fifth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor in the department of comparative literature and the program of critical theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of numerous influential books, including “Dispossession: The Performative in the Political,” which she co-authored with Athena Athanasiou. She will publish a book on public assemblies with Harvard University Press this year.

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Part 4: Black Lives: Between Grief and Action

This is the fourth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Joy James, a political philosopher who is a professor of the humanities and political science at Williams College.  She is the author of “Seeking the Beloved Community: A Feminist Race Reader.” 

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Part 3: White Anxiety and the Futility of Black Hope

This is the third in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Shannon Sullivan, a professor in the department of philosophy at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. She is the author of “Good White People: The Problem with Middle-Class White Anti-Racism.

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”Part 2: Lost in Rawlsland

This week’s conversation is with Charles Mills, the John Evans Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy at Northwestern University and the author of several books, including the influential 1997 work “The Racial Contract.”

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Part 1: What ‘White Privilege’ Really Means

This week’s conversation is with Naomi Zack, a professor of philosophy at the University of Oregon and the author of “The Ethics and Mores of Race: Equality After the History of Philosophy.”

Black America is getting screwed

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  • Shocking new study highlights the depths of economic disparities
  • Black retail workers are twice as likely to live below the poverty line, and twice as likely to be unemployed. Why?
  • 40 Reasons US Jails And Prisons Are Full Of Black And Poor People

David Dayen, Salon

unemployment-benefits.jpeg2-620x412.jpgA job seeker fills out an application during a National Career Fairs job fair Wednesday, April 22, 2015, in Chicago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green) (Credit: AP) 

Tuesday, Jun 2, 2015 | Before being assassinated, Martin Luther King envisioned a Poor People’s Campaign descending on Washington to demand better education, jobs and social insurance. He saw it as an extension of his work on civil rights, equal in importance and scope. In “a nation gorged on money while millions of its citizens are denied a good education, adequate health services, meaningful employment, and even respect,” King wrote in announcing the Poor People’s Campaign, “all of us can almost feel the presence of a kind of social insanity which could lead to national ruin.”

Forty-seven years after the Poor People’s Campaign ended, political discussion in liberal activist circles has bifurcated in unnecessary ways. There are separate economic and racial justice movements, and as my Salon colleague Joan Walsh points out, political leaders too often speak to only one or the other. But these movements are different facets of one fight; if black lives matter, surely their economic lives matter too. And a new report shows that people of color still face discrimination and hardship in their fight for economic dignity, as sure as they do in the fight for basic respect.

David Dayen is a contributing writer for Salon

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40 Reasons US Jails And Prisons Are Full Of Black And Poor People, Bill Quigley, Countercurrents.org

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What does it say about our society that it uses its jails and prisons as the primary detention facilities for poor and black and brown people who have been racially targeted and jail them with the mentally ill and chemically dependent?

Let Kevin Annett speak! Canada Elaborately Covers Up Its Own Genocide!

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  • Canada's elaborate coverup of its own genocide nevertheless proves guilt, criminal intent of government, churches.  
  • "They have lost their legal and moral right to exist ..." - Brussels Tribunal

As It Happens

Submitted by Evergreene Digest Contributing Editor Gary G. Kohls.

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images/1-96638c17cc.jpgJune 2, 2015 | Canada's expensive, seven year attempt to whitewash its mass murder of aboriginal children ended in lies and shame yesterday, when the state-funded "Truth and Reconciliation Commission" (TRC) released its final report into the murderous Indian residential school system that obscured more than it revealed - and held nobody liable for the worst crime in Canadian history.

The $68 million TRC report acknowledged that genocide had in fact taken place in Canada, but named no perpetrators, ignored the legal consequences of this crime, and effectively absolved Canada and its churches for the systemic rape, torture and killing of aboriginal children that spanned over a century.

Kevin D. Annett, author and publicist, was re-nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2015. 

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