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Race & Ethnicity

Coretta Scott King’s Scathing Takedown Of Jeff Sessions Is A Must-Read

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  • She fought for the Voting Rights Act, while Sessions called it “intrusive.”
  • You can read her full testimony here.

Alana Horowitz Satlin, the Huffington Post

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01/11/2017 | Author Coretta Scott King, the widow of Martin Luther King Jr., wrote a scathing testimony against Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) when he was being considered for federal judgeship in 1986. In a letter sent to then-Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.), King wrote that Sessions “lacks the temperament, fairness, and judgement to be a federal judge” and said that his appointment “would irreparably damage the work of my husband.”

 

The letter was first cited by BuzzFeed on Tuesday and The Washington Post later published it in full.

Author Coretta Scott King is the widow of Martin Luther King Jr.

Alana Horowitz Satlin, Assignment Editor, the Huffington Post.

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Series | Zinn Education Project - Dec. 29, 1890, Anniversary of the Wounded Knee Massacre

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  • Part 1: Dec. 29, 1890: Anniversary of the Wounded Knee Massacre
  • Here are resources on Native American history and contemporary issues for teaching (and learning!) outside the textbook.
  • Part 2: December 29, 1890 - Wounded Knee Massacre
  • The 7th Cavalry (Custer's old command) fired their artillery amidst mostly unarmed women, children, and fleeing men.

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest 

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Part 1: Dec. 29, 1890: Anniversary of the Wounded Knee Massacre

Here are resources on Native American history and contemporary issues for teaching (and learning!) outside the textbook.

The Zinn Education Project

https://zinnedproject-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/wounded_knee_artwork-213x300.jpg Poster: We Remember Wounded Knee

On Dec. 29, 1890, a Lakota encampment on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation was attacked by the U.S. Army and close to 300 Native Americans were murdered near Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota. 

Read more about the massacre at the Last of the Independents website.

Beginning on Feb. 27, 1973, 83 years later, Wounded Knee was the site of a 71-day standoff between the American Indian Movement and federal law enforcement officials. Watch Episode 5 from the film We Shall Remain on Wounded Knee history.

Here are resources on Native American history and contemporary issues for teaching (and learning!) outside the textbook.

The Zinn Education Project promotes and supports the teaching of people’s history in middle and high school classrooms across the country. Based on the lens of history highlighted in Howard Zinn’s best-selling book A People’s History of the United States, the website offers free, downloadable lessons and articles organized by theme, time period, and reading level.

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Part 2: December 29, 1890 - Wounded Knee Massacre

The 7th Cavalry (Custer's old command) fired their artillery amidst mostly unarmed women, children, and fleeing men.

Carl Bunin, Today in Peace and Justice History 

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December 29, 1890 | The U.S. Army killed approximately 300 Oglala Sioux at Wounded Knee, in the new state of South Dakota. 

The 7th Cavalry (Custer's old command) fired their artillery amidst mostly unarmed women, children, and fleeing men. 

Carl Bunin: Publisher, Today in Peace and Justice History, a weekly peace and justice history mailing.

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Brothers in White Resentment

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  • What gave us Donald Trump is what gave us Dylann Roof.
  • Related: Racism With No Racists: The President Trump Conundrum

Jamelle Bouie, Slate

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http://www.slate.com/content/dam/slate/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2016/12/161215_POL_Trump-Roof.jpg.CROP.promo-xlarge2.jpg Donald Trump did not cause Dylann Roof. But there are clear thematic connections between the two. Photo illustration by Slate. Photos by Drew Angerer/Getty Images, Grace Beahm-Pool/Getty Images.

On June 16, 2015, Donald Trump took the stage at his eponymous tower in New York City and announced his bid for the White House. His message was clear. “The U.S. has become a dumping ground for everyone else's problems,” Trump said.

A day later, in South Carolina, 21-year-old Dylann Roof walked into Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, where members were holding Bible study. Using a .45-caliber Glock handgun and eight magazines of ammunition, Roof shot and killed nine people, including the pastor, the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, who was also a state senator. Before he arrived at the church, Roof posted a manifesto on his website, a racist tirade that expressed his motives. His message was also clear. “Integration has done nothing but bring Whites down to level of brute animals,” wrote Roof.

Jamelle Bouie is Slate’s chief political correspondent.

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Related: 

Racism With No Racists: The President Trump Conundrum, Tressie McMillan Cottom, tressiemc <>

  • If the media cannot call that racism, will they be able to cover President-elect Donald Trump?
  • And while they figure it out, how bad will the lives of racial people get while racism hides behind euphemisms?
  • Related: Another Election Loser: Corporate Media

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An Ideal Blueprint: The Original Black Panther Party Model and Why It Should Be Duplicated

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The (Black Panther Party's) BPP's model is needed today. A firm foundation of knowledge, history, internationalism, and political economy is needed. A concerted effort to bond with and assist our working-class communities and disenfranchised sisters and brothers is needed. An infusion of authentic, working-class politics which shifts the focus from 'middle-class erosion' to 'multi-generational disenfranchisement' is needed. The blueprint is there. Let's use it.

Colin Jenkins, The Hampton Institute

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http://www.hamptoninstitution.org/images/BPP.JPG July 10th, 2014 | The rise of the Black Panther Party (BPP) in the late 1960s signified a monumental step toward the development of self-determination in the United States. In a nation that has long suffered a schizophrenic existence, characterized by a grand facade of "freedom, liberty and democracy" hiding what Alexis de Tocqueville once aptly described as "old aristocratic colours breaking through,"[1] the BPP model provided hope to not only Black Americans who had experienced centuries of inhumane treatment, but also to the nation's exploited and oppressed working class majority that had been inherently disregarded by both the founding fathers' framework and the predatory nature of capitalism.

As we grind our way through the tail-end of a neoliberal storm, it has become clear that in an age of extreme inequality, unabated corporate power, and overwhelming government corruption at all levels; we have a war on our hands. Not a war in the traditional international sense, but a domestic class war; one that has decimated our communities, our hopes for a better future, our children's educations, and our collective physical and mental well-being. The aggressors in this war are powerful - so much so that resistance often seems futile, and the opposition insurmountable. Multi-trillion dollar financial institutions and multi-billion dollar corporations pulling the strings of the most powerful politicians - Presidents, Senators, Congress members, and Governors alike - all of whom have at their disposal the abilities to print money at will, control markets through fiscal and monetary policy, deploy powerful militaries anywhere in the world, and unleash militarized police forces to terrorize our neighborhoods.

Colin Jenkins, an interdisciplinary researcher and writeris founder, is editor and Social Economics Department chair at the Hampton Institute. He has been published at Truthout, Common Dreams, Dissident Voice, Black Agenda Report, Popular Resistance, Z Magazine, and New Politics.

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