You are here

Race & Ethnicity

Race & Ethnicity

"The Invention Of The White Race" ~ Theodore W. Allen

http://cdn.billmoyers.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/takingaboutrace_606x154b.jpg

"The Invention of the White Race" (Verso Books) by Theodore W. Allen, especially Vol. II: "The Origin of Racial Oppression in Anglo-America."

Presentation by Jeffrey B. Perry

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Subscribe%20logo.jpg To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest

Mar 17, 2013 | "The Invention of the White Race" presents a full-scale challenge to what Allen refers to as "The Great White Assumption" -- "the unquestioning, indeed unthinking acceptance of the  'white' identity of European-Americans of all classes as a natural attribute rather than a social construct." 

Its thesis on the origin and nature of the "white race" contains the root of a new and radical approach to United States history, one that challenges master narratives taught in the media and in schools, colleges, and universities. With its equalitarian motif and emphasis on class struggle it speaks to people today who strive for change worldwide.

Jeffrey B. Perry is an independent, working-class scholar formally educated at Princeton, Harvard, Rutgers, and Columbia. His work focuses on the role of white supremacy as a retardant to progressive social change and on the centrality of struggle against white supremacy to progressive social change efforts.

Full story (video) … 

No Passes for Stereotyping — Of Any Kind

http://dy00k1db5oznd.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/GettyImages-590028618-1280x720.jpg

A coal miner's boot represents the life and work that once went on inside the St. Nicholas Coal Breaker, which once processed 12,500 tons of coal per day. It closed in 1972. Now, in the small northeastern Pennsylvania town of Manahoy City, more than 17 percent of the population is living below the poverty line. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)

Trump has made a "safe space" for bigotry. Opposing him shouldn't cause us to engage in a different brand of belittling.

John Russo and Sherry Linkon, Moyers & Company 

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/I%20Want%20You.jpg If you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

 

 

 


http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Millennials%20for%20Revolution%20%7C%20Decency.jpgSeptember 13, 2016 | When Mitt Romney dismissed the 47 percent of voters who, he predicted, would support Barack Obama “no matter what” as “victims” who depend on government assistance, liberal critics called foul. The quote, caught on video by a bartender at a Florida fundraiser in September 2012, reinforced Romney’s image as an elitist whose interests were firmly aligned with the wealthy. Not surprisingly, Democrats repeatedly used the line against Romney, and while we can’t blame his defeat in that year’s election on that one line, it sure didn’t help, especially in Rust Belt states like Ohio.

Last Friday, Hillary Clinton said the following:

You know, just to be grossly generalistic, you could put half of Trump’s supporters into what I call the basket of deplorables. They’re racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic — you name it. And unfortunately there are people like that. And he has lifted them up. He has given voice to their websites that used to only have 11,000 people – now have 11 million. He tweets and retweets their offensive, hateful, mean-spirited rhetoric. Now some of these folks, they are irredeemable, but thankfully they are not America. But the other basket – and I know this because I see friends from all over America here – I see friends from Florida and Georgia and South Carolina and Texas – as well as, you know, New York and California–but that other basket of people are people who feel that the government has let them down, the economy has let them down, nobody cares about them, nobody worries about what happens to their lives and their futures, and they’re just desperate for change. It doesn’t really even matter where it comes from. They don’t buy everything he says, but he seems to hold out some hope that their lives will be different. They won’t wake up and see their jobs disappear, lose a kid to heroin, feel like they’re in a dead end. Those are people we have to understand and empathize with as well.

John Russo is the former co-director of the Center for Working-Class Studies and coordinator of the Labor Studies Program at Youngstown State University

and Sherry Linko, a professor of English at Georgetown University and a faculty affiliate of the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor, edits the blog Working-Class Perspectives and is working on a book about the literature of deindustrialization. 

Full story … 

How a Museum Reckons With Black Pain

http://cdn.billmoyers.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/takingaboutrace_606x154b.jpg

  • The Smithsonian’s new memorial of African American history and culture is at once triumphant and crushing.
  • Related: Black Lives Don’t Matter to Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton.

Vann R. Newkirk II, the Atlantic

http://www.evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/twitter-4-512.png Now you can follow Evergreene Digest on Twitter.

 

 


https://cdn.theatlantic.com/assets/media/img/mt/2016/09/RTSNR10/lead_960.jpg?1474640977A woman passes a display depicting the Mexico Olympic protest at the National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Kevin Lamarque / Reuters

Sep 23, 2016 | I should not be here.

By the cold universal logic of statistics, none of us should; each of the near-7-billion lives on Earth is a mathematical fluke. But as an American black person, albeit as a free person with a fairly full complement of civil rights, I’ve always been aware of the especially immense unlikelihood of my own existence. For four centuries, most people who look like me and the vast majority of the people who gave rise to my own flesh and blood have been killed, crushed, or disenfranchised under the torture rack of white supremacy and racial injustice. As police violence, voting rights, and Donald Trump’s promises of Big Racism dominate our political conversations, and as protests and riots roil the streets of my birthplace of Charlotte, I’m reminded that I may be thanking my lucky stars a bit too soon.

Vann R. Newkirk II is a staff writer at the Atlantic, where he covers politics and policy.

Full story … 

 

Related:

 

Black Lives Don’t Matter to Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton, Bill Blum, Truthdig

http://www.truthdig.com/images/reportuploads/Black_Lives_Matter_protest_590.jpgA Black Lives Matter protest in New York City. (The All-Nite Images / CC BY-SA 2.0)

  • One thing the (Black Lives Matter) BLM analyses don’t do, however, is endorse a presidential candidate. And that’s for an eminently good reason: The candidates of both major parties, in their quests for power, have chosen to snub and malign the movement and the cause it represents.
  • Related: The Normalization of Evil in American Politics

Black Lives Don’t Matter to Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton

http://cdn.billmoyers.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/takingaboutrace_606x154b.jpg

  • One thing the (Blacl Lives Matter) BLM analyses don’t do, however, is endorse a presidential candidate. And that’s for an eminently good reason: The candidates of both major parties, in their quests for power, have chosen to snub and malign the movement and the cause it represents.
  • Related: The Normalization of Evil in American Politics

Bill Blum, Truthdig

http://www.truthdig.com/images/reportuploads/Black_Lives_Matter_protest_590.jpg A Black Lives Matter protest in New York City. (The All-Nite Images / CC BY-SA 2.0)

Sep 12, 2016 | America has its own killing fields. Over the Labor Day weekend, the city of Chicago recorded its 500th homicide of the year. Black residents account for more than 77 percent of the tally. Among the fallen was Nykea Aldridge (cousin of NBA superstar Dwyane Wade), who was gunned down on Aug. 26 by a two gang members while she wheeled a baby stroller on the municipality’s South Side.

The murder rate in Chicago is the highest in 20 years. Still, it’s by no means the nation’s worst. New Orleans, St. Louis, Detroit, Baltimore and Newark all have greater levels of lethal violence.

Bill Blum, Truthdig contributor, is a former judge and death penalty defense attorney. He is the author of three legal thrillers published by Penguin/Putnam (“Prejudicial Error,” “The Last Appeal” and “The Face of Justice”) and is a contributing writer for California Lawyer magazine.

Full story … 

Related: 

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Subscribe%20logo.jpgTo stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest.


The Normalization of Evil in American Politics, Adele M. Stan, the American Prospect / AlterNet 

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Politics%20Banner.jpg

The misogynist, racist, nativist, anti-LGBT right wing that took over the GOP in 1980—of which (Family Research Council President Tony) Perkins himself is evidence—has much to answer for, not least of all, the rise of Donald Trump as the party’s standard-bearer. Trump may not have been the first choice of right-wing leaders, but they created the conditions that cleared his path to the nomination, and most have lined up behind him since he won it.

Pages