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Race & Ethnicity

Race & Ethnicity

10 Ways White Liberals Perpetuate Racism

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Only through continued growth, awareness, and acknowledgment that words matter can something as ugly as racism be overcome.

George Sachs, Everyday Feminism

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http://everydayfeminism.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/perpetuate-300x200.jpgCheerful person in a yellow shirt shrugs their arms in confusion or in question with a group of people in blue shirts behind them.

October 2, 2016 | Last week an article was published in the September issue of the The Atlantic titled “The Coddling of the American Mind.”

The goal of the article was to show that college students (aka Millennials) are increasingly rigid in their language, especially those words or phrases involving race, gender, religion, or any other target status. This is commonly referred to as political correctness.

The authors’ thesis was that “college students are increasingly demanding protection from words and ideas they don’t like.” They go on to conclude that this political correctness is unhealthy and “disastrous” for education and mental health.

George Sachs is clinical child psychologist and founder of the Sachs Center for ADD/ADHD and Aspergers in Manhattan. He specializes in the testing and holistic alternative treatment of ADD/ADHD in children, teens and adults, utilizing social skills groups and Neurofeedback for ADHD

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Divest From Prisons, Invest in People—What Justice for Black Lives Really Looks Like

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Photo by Joe Brusky / Flickr. 

  • Instead of addressing the roots of drug addiction, mental illness, and poverty, we’ve come to accept policing and incarceration as catch-all solutions. It’s time for a change.
  • We’ve come to accept policing and incarceration as catch-all solutions.
  • Related: A Former Police Chief: Put Down the Big Stick

Liza Bayless, Yes! Magazine

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Editor%20Comment%20graphic_0.jpg Yes! Magazine Editor's Note: This article is the second part of a series of conversations with contributors to the demands of the Movement for Black Lives. Part One was on reparations.  

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/01/11/opinion/justice190v.jpg  Oct 11, 2016 | In July 2015, more than 2,000 members of The Movement for Black Lives—a group composed of more than 50 racial justice organizations—convened in Cleveland to recognize the violence committed against Black people in this country and around the world. At the assembly, participants decided the Movement needed to form a coalition that articulated concrete ways to build a more equitable society. Six legislative platforms emerged that covered issues like economic justice, reparations, political empowerment, and divestment from policing and incarceration. In their Invest-Divest platform, the authors called instead for investment in programming, like restorative justice initiatives, that would decrease incarceration and strengthen communities.

According to the Brookings Institution, White Americans are equally likely to use and more likely to deal drugs, while African Americans are more likely to be arrested, convicted, and sentenced harshly. For U.S. residents born in 2001, the Bureau of Justice Statistics predicts that 1 in 111 White women will go to prison in her lifetime, while 1 in 18 Black women will. For White men, the likelihood is 1 in 17; for Black men, 1 in 3.

Liza Bayles is an editorial intern at YES! Liza wrote this article for YES!.  

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A Former Police Chief: Put Down the Big Stick, David C. Couper, the Progressive 

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There is a long and difficult road ahead of us. We know what it is because we have heard it before for so many years. The 1968 Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence (Kerner Commission) identified the problem: we are becoming two societies, one black, one white, separate and unequal. It’s the same today.

 

"The Invention Of The White Race" ~ Theodore W. Allen

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"The Invention of the White Race" (Verso Books) by Theodore W. Allen, especially Vol. II: "The Origin of Racial Oppression in Anglo-America."

Presentation by Jeffrey B. Perry

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Mar 17, 2013 | "The Invention of the White Race" presents a full-scale challenge to what Allen refers to as "The Great White Assumption" -- "the unquestioning, indeed unthinking acceptance of the  'white' identity of European-Americans of all classes as a natural attribute rather than a social construct." 

Its thesis on the origin and nature of the "white race" contains the root of a new and radical approach to United States history, one that challenges master narratives taught in the media and in schools, colleges, and universities. With its equalitarian motif and emphasis on class struggle it speaks to people today who strive for change worldwide.

Jeffrey B. Perry is an independent, working-class scholar formally educated at Princeton, Harvard, Rutgers, and Columbia. His work focuses on the role of white supremacy as a retardant to progressive social change and on the centrality of struggle against white supremacy to progressive social change efforts.

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No Passes for Stereotyping — Of Any Kind

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A coal miner's boot represents the life and work that once went on inside the St. Nicholas Coal Breaker, which once processed 12,500 tons of coal per day. It closed in 1972. Now, in the small northeastern Pennsylvania town of Manahoy City, more than 17 percent of the population is living below the poverty line. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)

Trump has made a "safe space" for bigotry. Opposing him shouldn't cause us to engage in a different brand of belittling.

John Russo and Sherry Linkon, Moyers & Company 

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http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/default/files/Millennials%20for%20Revolution%20%7C%20Decency.jpgSeptember 13, 2016 | When Mitt Romney dismissed the 47 percent of voters who, he predicted, would support Barack Obama “no matter what” as “victims” who depend on government assistance, liberal critics called foul. The quote, caught on video by a bartender at a Florida fundraiser in September 2012, reinforced Romney’s image as an elitist whose interests were firmly aligned with the wealthy. Not surprisingly, Democrats repeatedly used the line against Romney, and while we can’t blame his defeat in that year’s election on that one line, it sure didn’t help, especially in Rust Belt states like Ohio.

Last Friday, Hillary Clinton said the following:

You know, just to be grossly generalistic, you could put half of Trump’s supporters into what I call the basket of deplorables. They’re racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic — you name it. And unfortunately there are people like that. And he has lifted them up. He has given voice to their websites that used to only have 11,000 people – now have 11 million. He tweets and retweets their offensive, hateful, mean-spirited rhetoric. Now some of these folks, they are irredeemable, but thankfully they are not America. But the other basket – and I know this because I see friends from all over America here – I see friends from Florida and Georgia and South Carolina and Texas – as well as, you know, New York and California–but that other basket of people are people who feel that the government has let them down, the economy has let them down, nobody cares about them, nobody worries about what happens to their lives and their futures, and they’re just desperate for change. It doesn’t really even matter where it comes from. They don’t buy everything he says, but he seems to hold out some hope that their lives will be different. They won’t wake up and see their jobs disappear, lose a kid to heroin, feel like they’re in a dead end. Those are people we have to understand and empathize with as well.

John Russo is the former co-director of the Center for Working-Class Studies and coordinator of the Labor Studies Program at Youngstown State University

and Sherry Linko, a professor of English at Georgetown University and a faculty affiliate of the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor, edits the blog Working-Class Perspectives and is working on a book about the literature of deindustrialization. 

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How a Museum Reckons With Black Pain

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  • The Smithsonian’s new memorial of African American history and culture is at once triumphant and crushing.
  • Related: Black Lives Don’t Matter to Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton.

Vann R. Newkirk II, the Atlantic

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https://cdn.theatlantic.com/assets/media/img/mt/2016/09/RTSNR10/lead_960.jpg?1474640977A woman passes a display depicting the Mexico Olympic protest at the National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Kevin Lamarque / Reuters

Sep 23, 2016 | I should not be here.

By the cold universal logic of statistics, none of us should; each of the near-7-billion lives on Earth is a mathematical fluke. But as an American black person, albeit as a free person with a fairly full complement of civil rights, I’ve always been aware of the especially immense unlikelihood of my own existence. For four centuries, most people who look like me and the vast majority of the people who gave rise to my own flesh and blood have been killed, crushed, or disenfranchised under the torture rack of white supremacy and racial injustice. As police violence, voting rights, and Donald Trump’s promises of Big Racism dominate our political conversations, and as protests and riots roil the streets of my birthplace of Charlotte, I’m reminded that I may be thanking my lucky stars a bit too soon.

Vann R. Newkirk II is a staff writer at the Atlantic, where he covers politics and policy.

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Black Lives Don’t Matter to Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton, Bill Blum, Truthdig

http://www.truthdig.com/images/reportuploads/Black_Lives_Matter_protest_590.jpgA Black Lives Matter protest in New York City. (The All-Nite Images / CC BY-SA 2.0)

  • One thing the (Black Lives Matter) BLM analyses don’t do, however, is endorse a presidential candidate. And that’s for an eminently good reason: The candidates of both major parties, in their quests for power, have chosen to snub and malign the movement and the cause it represents.
  • Related: The Normalization of Evil in American Politics

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