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Race & Ethnicity

Race & Ethnicity

Hispanics Leaving Connecticut Town, Citing Racial Abuse By Police

"This is a systemwide leadership failure. It's going to need widespread reform," said Dermot Lynch, a student intern with Yale Law School's Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic, whose group filed a lawsuit in October on behalf of nine immigrants who say East Haven police abused them with beatings and unwarranted use of a stun gun. It also quotes officers using ethnic slurs.

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Michael Melia, Associated Press/Huffington Post

Santiago Malave has worked law enforcement jobs in Connecticut for more than four decades, but as a Puerto Rican, he says he cannot drive through his own town without worrying about police harassing him.

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Malave, a probation officer who works in New Haven, says the racial abuse is so bad that he only crosses the town line into East Haven to go home. He and his wife are now preparing to sell their house and move, joining an exodus of Hispanics who say police have hassled them with traffic stops, false arrests and even jailhouse beatings.

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Black Harvard doctor pens memoir of Jim Crow South

By becoming orthopedic chief at Harvard, White admitted, he could have lost touch with his past while walking in circles of the wealthy and Harvard-connected. But White, who now lives in Weston, Mass., said he couldn’t forget those in Memphis and mentors who helped him, even at a time when helping an African-American was dangerous.

Russell Contreras, Associated Press/Boston (MA) Herald

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In this Dec. 21, 2010 photo, Harvard Medical School professor Augustus White poses at his office in Boston. White's memoir, "Seeing Patients," calls for more diversity in the medical field and an end to health care disparities. (AP Photo - Chitose Suzuki)

Growing up in segregated Memphis, Tenn., during the Jim Crow era, Augustus White III knew about those certain places off-limits to him as a black man — restrooms, diners and schools.

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He just didn't pay racial barriers much mind.

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The son of a doctor and teacher became the first African-American to graduate from Stanford Medical School, the first African-American resident and surgery professor at Yale and later the first black department head at Harvard's teaching hospitals.

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Now 74 and one of the nation's leading orthopedic surgeons, White is releasing a memoir on his life. The book, Seeing Patients: Unconscious Bias in Health Care (Harvard University Press, $27.95), is also a call for more diversity in the medical field and the end to health care disparities, something the Harvard professor calls "the last frontier of racial prejudice."

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Republicans Hope to Trample Constitution With Racist New Proposals

For the last two years, conservatives have flouted their disdain for the Constitution and their desire to effectively replace it with a Tea Party manifesto. Sadly, they appear to be wasting no time after last November’s election in declaring war on the nation’s founding document.

Ian Millhiser, ThinkProgress

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Flush with excitement over their recent electoral gains, Republican state lawmakers are partying like it’s 1859. A group of lawmakers from 14 states, led by nativist Arizona state Senator Russell Pearce (R), plan to thumb their nose at the 14th Amendment’s grant of citizenship to nearly all persons born within the United States by introducing legislation that will “end birthright citizenship for the children of illegal aliens.”

Meanwhile, Florida Senate President Mike Haridopolos (R) recently returned to his state from a Beltway pilgrimage to GOP interest groups, such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, intended to drum up support for his expected upcoming U.S. Senate race. Shortly after completing this pilgrimage, Haridopolos laid out a plan to fast-track an obviously unconstitutional proposal that would nullify the Affordable Care Act.

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Bachmann attacks $1.2B payout for black farmers

Minnesota Republican Michele Bachmann calls the $1.2 billion deal "indefensible." Farmers say it rights a historic wrong.

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Kevin Diaz, Minneapolis Star Tribune | MN

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Congress gave the final go-ahead Tuesday (Nov 30) to a landmark $1.2 billion settlement compensating black farmers for decades of discrimination, even as Minnesota Republican Michele Bachmann and other conservatives charged that the deal is riddled with fraudulent claims.

The long-delayed package, negotiated by the Obama administration, could award some $50,000 each to thousands of African-Americans who claimed they were unjustly denied loans and assistance from the federal Agriculture Department in the 1980s and '90s. Right up until the final 256-152 vote in the House, Bachmann -- along with Iowa Republican Steve King and others -- called for an investigation of the settlement, known as Pigford II.

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