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Pat Bagley | Trump Islam / media.cagle.com

Why did this powerful church group struggle to denounce white supremacy?

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‘It would be a mistake to interpret this fiasco simply as a misstep.’ Photograph: Natalie Behring/Getty Images

  • The Southern Baptist Convention’s reluctance to condemn racism is not only true to its history but it reflects how white supremacy is built into the very DNA of American Christianity.
  • Related: White Racism in America's Police Departments Is So Much Worse Than Most Americans Understand.

Daniel José Camacho, the Guardian 

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http://cdn.billmoyers.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/takingaboutrace_606x154b.jpgSaturday, 17 June 2017 | Condemning white supremacy and the alt-right movement shouldn’t be hard. But the Southern Baptist Convention – the nation’s largest Protestant denomination– had its doubts about whether to do so this week.

During the annual meeting, they initially declined to pass a resolution doing just that. Chaos ensued at the denomination’s annual meeting and a firestorm of criticism quickly followed. Delegates eventually passed a modified version of the resolution – originally drafted by one of its black pastors – but the damage had been done.

Daniel José Camacho is a Contributing Opinion Writer at Guardian US. His writing has appeared in Christian Century, Religion Dispatches, Sojourners, Duke Magazine, and TIME, and his commentary has appeared in the New York Times.

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Related:

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White Racism in America's Police Departments Is So Much Worse Than Most Americans Understand, Jeff Pegues, Prometheus Books / Alternet

CBS News correspondent Jeff Pegues' new book exposes the under-reported "ghost skins": hidden white supremacists in law enforcement.

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Catholic Women and Holy Orders: The Time Is Now

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Left to right: Episcopa (Bishop) Theodora, St. Praxedis, Virgin Mary, and St. Pudentiana. Titular basilica of St. Praxedis, Rome, A.D. 820

  • Women have been excluded from the sacrament of Holy Orders based upon Church teachings that do not stand up under scrutiny. These teachings build upon erroneous assumptions and rationales that are not in accord with historical facts, sound reasoning, and good theology.
  • Now is the time for our entire Church – laity, clergy, and hierarchy – to recognize and correct these errors.
  • Related: Religion as a Front for Tyranny: A Roundtable on the Timeliness of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Council of the Baptized 

 

Thanks to Evergreene Digest reader/contributor Robert Wedl for this contribution.

 

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February, 2017 | 

“The joy and hope, the grief and anguish of the [people] of our time ... are the joy and hope, the grief and anguish of the followers of Christ as well.”

These opening words from the Vatican II document Gaudium et Spes declare that the Church stands in solidarity with all people. For Catholic women, however, this declaration has not materialized into practice within our Church. For many Catholic women, grief remains unacknowledged. Though qualified by Baptism and called by the Holy Spirit, women cannot receive the sacrament of Holy Orders and serve the Church as deacons, priests, or bishops. The Council of the Baptized urges priests, bishops, and lay people to champion the full inclusion of women at all levels of the Church.

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Council%20of%20the%20Baptized%20logo.jpgThis paper is published by the Council of the Baptized which is a 21 member panel of Catholics, chartered in January 2012, to be a collegial voice for a growing community of Catholics in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis in honoring their baptismal responsibility for their local church

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Related:

http://religiondispatches.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Screen-Shot-2017-05-09-at-8.01.21-AM-690x460.jpgReligion as a Front for Tyranny: A Roundtable on the Timeliness of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” Anita Little, Religion Dispatches 

We have only to look at how Trump conflated Christianity with white nationalism and threw in a pinch of opposition to reproductive freedom to see how far someone who is skilled at manipulating religion can get.

 



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Religion as a Front for Tyranny: A Roundtable on the Timeliness of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale”

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We have only to look at how Trump conflated Christianity with white nationalism and threw in a pinch of opposition to reproductive freedom to see how far someone who is skilled at manipulating religion can get.

Anita Little, Religion Dispatches

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May 17, 2017 | “Nothing changes instantaneously. In a gradually heating bathtub, you’d be boiled to death before you knew it.”

This inner monologue from Offred, the protagonist of Hulu’s adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale, is a warning that echoes in our time. When Margaret Atwood published the dystopian novel in 1985, she said there was nothing in the book that hadn’t already happened. What makes the story so eerie to read now is that sense of recognition, of creeping familiarity.

http://religiondispatches.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/original1.jpg Anita Little is the editor of the Remapping American Christianities initiative at Religion Dispatches. Prior to that, she was the associate editor at Ms. magazine where she spent three years covering the intersections of gender, race and class. Little's work has been published in Ms., Angeleno, Alternet, Ebony and Pacific Standard. 

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How (and how not) to address racism in the church

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  • As the Black Lives Matter movement and immigration concerns continue to shine the national spotlight on racism in the United States, surely church leadership shouldn’t be taking a step back.  
  • A pastoral letter from the U.S. bishops won’t solve racism. Becoming an intercultural church might.

A U.S. Catholic interview 

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http://www.truthdig.com/images/eartothegrounduploads/sonlaliblack_590.jpg May 2017 | In 1979 the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) issued a pastoral letter on racism entitled “Brothers and Sisters to Us.” It was significant because it was the strongest statement by the U.S. bishops declaring racism a sin. However, a problematic title to this otherwise dynamic document seemed to perpetuate exactly this racial “us” versus “them” the document itself was trying to alleviate. Just who is “us”? critics asked, pointing out how the title implied that the American church’s membership and leadership was of European descent. Where were the black, Asian, and Latino Catholics in the conversation? 

It’s been almost 40 years since that document, and tense race relations in the church and society have anything but subsided. Father Simon Kim, a Korean American priest and theologian who has researched racism in the church and is currently serving on the committee drafting the upcoming bishops’ document on racism, believes that the church has “taken a decline, a step back from the momentum of the ’79 document, and we’re not doing as much or anything substantial or relevant right now.” 

U.S. Catholic: With a strong focus on social justice, we offer a fresh and balanced take on the issues that matter most in our world, adding a faith perspective to such challenges as poverty, education, family life, and pop culture.

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