You are here

The vision for Evergreene Digest is to be the preferred one-stop on-line source for information and perspectives that major news entities exclude from the present day American conversation. The Internet makes it possible to loosen the grip on big media by taking the news into our own hands. We readers-turned-reporters can restore integrity to the nation's single most vital conduit for democratic participation, our media.

Home Page

Crocodile Tears on Memorial Day

 

https://www.dissentmagazine.org/wp-content/files_mf/1451880476ScrantonIraqWarmemorial_BostonDixieLawrence2009666.jpg

  • It is these politicians who, without hesitation, will quickly send American youth into war, and claim that killing people a half-world away somehow protects American citizens. And once Americans are in combat, these same politicians will complain about the cost of war, and vote against providing adequate funds for decent medical and psychological treatment for those who come home damaged.
  • Part 1: Memorial Day Crocodile Tears from Those Who Create Wars
  • Part 2: Remembrance Day: Why I’ll Wear a Dandelion Instead of a Red Poppy

Compiled by David Culver, Ed., Evergreene Digest

 http://globalassets.starbucks.com/assets/20229527c1c240439ddbc81bf821d95e.jpg

 

If you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.



 

Part 1: Memorial Day Crocodile Tears from Those Who Create Wars

It is these politicians who, without hesitation, will quickly send American youth into war, and claim that killing people a half-world away somehow protects American citizens. And once Americans are in combat, these same politicians will complain about the cost of war, and vote against providing adequate funds for decent medical and psychological treatment for those who come home damaged.

Walter Brasch, Dandelion Salad

https://c7.staticflickr.com/1/29/48849822_4a2397541b_b.jpg

Image by Elvert Barnes via Flickr

May 29, 2016 |  A few million Americans may be thinking about it, but won’t be celebrating Memorial Day. For them, there’s not much to celebrate or to remember.

They’re the low-wage employees who may have to work all three days, without overtime; about three million workers earn the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Many work 30 to 35 hours a week, just low enough that their employers don’t have to pay for insurance, holidays, or sick leave. The corporate CEOs, of course, will be enjoying the long weekend at their alternate vacation homes in the mountains, or along the coasts, or at off-shore islands where they have found banks willing to hide their money and avoid U.S. taxes.

Walter Brasch is an award-winning journalist and the author of 20 books, is co-founder of the Northeast Pennsylvania Coalition for the Homeless. His latest book is Fracking America: Sacrificing Health and the Environment for Short-Term Economic Benefit.

Full story … 



 

Part 2: Remembrance Day: Why I’ll Wear a Dandelion Instead of a Red Poppy

And when he saw them marching up Whitehall
I remember what old Arthur said
He said the donkeys are all wearing poppies
So I shall wear dandelions instead  
--“Dandelions” written and sung by Steve O’Donoghue

Stop the War Coalition, Dandelion Salad

https://c4.staticflickr.com/6/5265/5620085419_1f249e8dd4_b.jpg Image by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

May 30, 2016 | And when he saw them marching up Whitehall

I remember what old Arthur said
He said the donkeys are all wearing poppies
So I shall wear dandelions instead

“Dandelions” written and sung by Steve O’Donoghue

Stop the War Coalition campaigns to end the occupations in Afghanistan & Palestine, against any attack on Iran or Syria, against Islamophobia, and in defence of civil liberties.

Full story … 

In Nine Democratic Debates, Not a Single Question About Poverty

  • While vague notions of “inequality” or “economic anxiety” were touched on occasionally, the issue of poverty and its effects remained entirely absent. No specific questions about poverty, its causes or possible federal solutions were asked by any of the moderators in any of the nine debates. If any of the candidates had a plan to ameliorate the plight of the poor, the moderators weren’t interested in hearing about it.
  • Related: Trump Isn't the Campaign Media's First Mistake

Adam Johnson, Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR) 

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Subscribe%20logo.jpg To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates from all reader supported Evergreene Digest.

http://fair.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/PovertyDebate-1-768x390.pngHomeless man on National Mall (cc photo: Elvert Barnes); ABC‘s David Muir at December 19 Democratic debate in Manchester, N.H.

Over 45 million Americans live in poverty—but you wouldn’t think potential leaders of the country are expected to know or care anything about this, listening to the questions asked by the elite journalists who moderated the Democratic debates this primary season.

A FAIR analysis of all nine democratic debates over the past seven months shows that not one question was asked about poverty. By contrast, 30 questions were asked about ISIS or terrorism (almost half of them concentrated in the December 19 debate, which took place days after the San Bernardino shootings) and 11 questions were asked Russia. Ten questions were asked about socialism or communism, all of which were directed at Bernie Sanders.

Adam Johnson is a contributing analyst for FAIR.org.

Full story … 

Related:

Trump Isn't the Campaign Media's First Mistake, Matt Taibbi, Rolling Stone

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Media%20%26%20Technology%20Banner.jpg

  • We've been getting this story wrong for ages, and Trump is the consequence.
  • Related: Amy Goodman on How the Media Is Ruining the 2016 Election by Focusing on ‘Trump-Land’

Section(s): 

A Drumbeat of Multiple Shootings, but America Isn’t Listening

  • Most shootings with four deaths or injuries are invisible outside their communities.
  • And most of the lives they scar are black.
  • Related: Racist McShootface

Sharon LaFraniere, Daniela Porat, and Agustin Armendariz, New York Times

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Support%20Independent%20Media.jpg   Journalism with real independence and integrity is a rare thing. All reader supported Evergreene Digest relies - exclusively!- on reader donations. Click on the donation button above to make a contribution and support our work.

https://static01.nyt.com/images/2016/05/11/us/multishoot-fb-photo/multishoot-fb-photo-superJumbo.jpg Seven people were shot in a matter of minutes last August at an Elks Lodge in Cincinnati. Credit: Gus Powell for the New York Times

May 22, 2016 | After the slaughter of nine worshipers at a South Carolina church last June, but before the massacre of eight students and a teacher at an Oregon community college in October, there was a shooting that the police here have labeled Incident 159022597.01. It happened on a clear Friday night at an Elks Lodge, on a modest block of clapboard houses northeast of this city’s hilly downtown. Unlike the butchery that bookended it, it merited no presidential statements, no saturation television coverage.

But what took place at 6101 Prentice Street on Aug. 21 may say more about the nature of gun violence in the United States than any of those far more famous rampages. It is a snapshot of a different sort of mass violence — one that erupts with such anesthetic regularity that it is rendered almost invisible, except to the mostly black victims, survivors and attackers.

Sharon  LaFraniere is an American journalist who has covered southern Africa and China for the New York Times. Daniela Porat: Reporter, Computer Assisted Reporting at the New York Times. Agustín Armendariz is an investigative reporter specializing in data analysis for ... "The Buying of the President" (2004) which was a New York Times bestseller.

Full story … 

Related:

Racist McShootface, Lucy McBath, Everytown for Gun Safety

  • http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Take%20Action%20Today%20button.jpgShame Missouri legislators for taking a dangerous step towards being the first new "Stand Your Ground" state since Trayvon's killing.
  • Related: Our gun myths are all wrong: The real history behind the Second Amendment clichés that have sustained our lethal gun culture.

 

Top 12 Reasons the Good War Was Bad: Hiroshima in Context

  • A column-length list of the top reasons that the good war was not good.
  • Consider this a friendly reminder to President Obama on his way to Hiroshima.

David Swanson, American Herald Tribune

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/%2522%40%2522%20Logo.jpg To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up here to receive the latest updates <>from all reader supported Evergreene Digest.

http://ahtribune.com/images/Welcome_Ceremony_in_Japan_33962.jpgWelcome Ceremony in Japan

May 24, 2016 | Consider this a friendly reminder to President Obama on his way to Hiroshima.

No matter how many years one writes books, does interviews, publishes columns, and speaks at events, it remains virtually impossible to make it out the door of an event in the United States at which you've advocated abolishing war without somebody hitting you with the what-about-the-good-war question.

Of course this belief that there was a good war 75 years ago is what moves the U.S. public to tolerate dumping a trillion dollars a year into preparing in case there's a good war next year, even in the face of so many dozens of wars during the past 70 years on which there's general consensus that they were not good. Without rich, well-established myths about World War II, current propaganda about Russia or Syria or Iraq would sound as crazy to most people as it sounds to me.

David Swanson is an American activist, blogger and author of "When the World Outlawed War," "War Is A Lie" and "Daybreak: Undoing the Imperial Presidency and Forming a More Perfect Union."

Full story … 

White Privilege: The Elephant in Minnesota's Living Room

http://cdn.billmoyers.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/takingaboutrace_606x154b.jpg

  • The reality is that those same marginalized communities that we are taught to demonize and pathologize over and over again do not have adequate access to political capital, social capital, or economic resources to reshape the systems that impact their lives.
  • Related: Yes They DO Hate Him Because He Is Black

Nekima Levy-Pounds, Minneapolis (MN) StarTrinune 

http://stmedia.startribune.com/images/610*425/rap072313a.jpgPhoto: Kristin Pelisek, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/MCT

May 20, 2014 | Let me warn you up front. Many of the folks reading this blog post may not like what I have to say. But that's neither here nor there. I have to get this off my chest. I am tired of attending meetings and events in which folks are having conversations about equity and are delicately skirting around the issue of race. Hardly ever are notions of racial bias and discrimination and just "plain ole racism" part of the conversation. All too often, such issues remain at a surface level, which leads to very safe, comfortable dialogue that does not push us to address the real challenges that are hindering our progress as a state and reinforcing intolerable racial disparities. 

Society is still separate; still unequal.

Beyond that, many of these conversations about "equity" consist of white Minnesotans in the upper echelon talking to each other about issues that impact communities of color and yet there are often just one or two "representatives" in the room from those communities. Half the time, I'm one of those two representatives. And when I look around those rooms and observe a sea of predominately white faces, it occurs to me that the lack of diversity around those tables and the relative comfort levels of those in attendance reveals more than any fifty page study ever could about the true state of race relations in Minnesota. Sadly, it appears that 60 years after the landmark Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education, our society is still separate and unequal and unwilling to change anytime soon. (If you don't believe me, please take time to travel to various neighborhoods throughout the Metro area and outstate Minnesota to see the levels of segregation and income inequality firsthand.)

Nekima Valdez Levy-Pounds is an American lawyer, professor, activist, writer, and preacher. She was elected in 2015 to be the president of the Minneapolis (MN) chapter of the NAACP.

Full story … 

Related:

 

 

http://www.evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/twitter-4-512.pngNow you can follow Evergreene Digest on Twitter.

 

 


Yes They DO Hate Him Because He Is Black, Scandalous One, Daily Kos

Any fair observation of what has transpired over Obama’s two terms would reveal an undeniable racial component in the way Republicans have approached his presidency. 

Series | Noam Chomsky: Who Rules the World? Part 1

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/World%20Banner_0.jpg

  • The elites’ contempt for “the lower class of these people” has taken various forms throughout the years. In recent times one expression of this contempt is the call for passivity and obedience (“moderation in democracy”) by liberal internationalists reacting to the dangerous democratizing effects of the popular movements of the 1960s.
  • Longtime activist and academic Noam Chomsky gives a broad overview of the state of the rulers and resisters around the globe.

Noam Chomsky, TomDispatch / In These Times

http://globalassets.starbucks.com/assets/20229527c1c240439ddbc81bf821d95e.jpgIf you like reading this article, consider joining the crew of all reader-supported Evergreene Digest by contributing the equivalent of a cafe latte a month--using the donation button above—so we can bring you more just like it.

 



 

http://inthesetimes.com/images/made/images/2387975490_961318a4d3_b_850_564.jpg (U.S. Army / Flickr)

[In These Times Editor's Note: This piece, the first of two parts, is excerpted from Noam Chomsky’s new book, Who Rules the World? (Metropolitan Books). The piece first appeared at TomDispatch.]

May 9, 2016 | When we ask “Who rules the world?” we commonly adopt the standard convention that the actors in world affairs are states, primarily the great powers, and we consider their decisions and the relations among them. That is not wrong. But we would do well to keep in mind that this level of abstraction can also be highly misleading.

States of course have complex internal structures, and the choices and decisions of the political leadership are heavily influenced by internal concentrations of power, while the general population is often marginalized. That is true even for the more democratic societies, and obviously for others. We cannot gain a realistic understanding of who rules the world while ignoring the “masters of mankind,” as Adam Smith called them: in his day, the merchants and manufacturers of England; in ours, multinational conglomerates, huge financial institutions, retail empires, and the like. Still following Smith, it is also wise to attend to the “vile maxim” to which the “masters of mankind” are dedicated: “All for ourselves and nothing for other people”—a doctrine known otherwise as bitter and incessant class war, often one-sided, much to the detriment of the people of the home country and the world.

Noam Chomsky is an American linguist, philosopher, cognitive scientist, logician, political commentator and activist. He is perhaps best known as a critic of all forms of social control and a relentless advocate for community-centered approaches to democracy and freedom. Over the last several decades, Chomsky has championed a wide range of dissident actions, organizations and social movements.

Full story … 

From the Archives | At Some Point, Progressives Need to Break Up With the Democratic Party

http://evergreenedigest.org/sites/evergreenedigest.org/files/Politics%20Banner.jpg

  • If you're a leftie, the Democratic establishment doesn't care about your opinion. They certainly don't want your input. What they want is your vote -- in exchange for exactly nothing in return. They're political parasites, draining the enthusiasm and idealism of progressives, simultaneously neutering and exploiting mainline libs.
  • It's time to get out of this abusive relationship.
  • Related: Chris Hedges: The Left Has Lost It’s Nerve and Direction
  • Related: Dennis Kucinich: Both Political Parties Have Failed America

Ted Rall AlterNet

http://theantimedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/clinton.jpgJuly 4, 2014  | At a certain point, if you have any relationship with dignity, you're supposed to get sick of being used and abused. Speaking of which: liberal Democrats.

Democratic politicians act like right-wingers. Liberals vote for them anyway.

The Democratic Party espouses right-wing policies. Self-described progressives give them cash.

Ted Rall, syndicated writer and the cartoonist for ANewDomain.net and SkewedNews.net, is the author of "Snowden," about the NSA whistleblower. His new book is "Bernie" about Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders.

Full story … 

Related:

The Left Has Lost It’s Nerve and Direction, Chris Hedges, Philadelphia (PA) Inquirer

If the left wants to regain influence in the nation's political life, it must be willing to walk away from the Democratic Party, even if Barack Obama is the nominee, and back progressive, third-party candidates until the Democrats feel enough heat to adopt our agenda. We must be willing to say no. If not, we become slaves.

###

http://www.truthdig.com/images/eartothegrounduploads/dennis-kucinich-both-parties-have-failed360.jpg Former Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio engages in debate. AP/Mark Duncan 

Dennis Kucinich: Both Political Parties Have Failed America, Truthdig AV Booth

  • Dennis Kucinich holds politicians accountable.
  • Corporate welfare’s quiet enablers: How democrats pander to big business

Pages

Subscribe to Home Page